ABOUT DUAL ENROLLMENT

Grand Canyon University (GCU) offers dual enrollment classes as an affordable and efficient way for high school students to gain a head start on their college degree. We are committed to ensuring that high school students experience the same level of instruction, resources and rigor as our traditional college students.


High School Dual Enrollment

students in classroom

Dual enrollment is offered as a benefit to schools, school districts or home school organizations that participate in:

  • Canyon Christian Schools Consortium (CCSC)
  • Participants in Learning, Leading and Serving (PLLS)
  • Canyon Educational Participant (CEP)
  • Alliance Program for Homeschool Achievement (ALPHA)

Dual Enrollment Online Courses
GCU has a wide range of online dual enrollment courses available to high school students. Each class is seven weeks long and start dates are available year-round.

Dual Enrollment Courses Taught at High School
Qualified high school teachers incorporate GCU curriculum into their class materials so students receive high school and college credit at the same time.  (Only Available in Arizona)


Dual Enrollment Benefits

High School District and Grand Canyon University

  • Increases high school graduation rates
  • Promotes high school student motivation and engagement
  • Provides students with more advanced, rigorous coursework
  • Helps build college awareness
  • Promotes college access for a wide range of students
  • Prepares students for the academic and behavioral expectations of college 


Faculty

  • Instructor recognition
  • Professional development opportunities

Student

  • Eligibility for standard scholarship opportunities at GCU
  • Access to the GCU Learning Lounge (online and walk-in tutoring) and GCU library services
  • Sporting events on campus
  • Open invitations to GCU campus events
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  • Savings in college tuition, books and fees through completion of degree work in three years

Transferability

Dual enrollment students receive a reduced tuition rate. The courses transfer into GCU degree programs and high school students who attend GCU will be eligible for freshman scholarships. GCU is regionally accredited, so in general, universities that accept transfer credits should accept dual enrollment credits. However, it is at the discretion of the receiving university whether to accept credits for transfer.

Student Qualifications

students at gcu honors college
  • High school juniors or seniors with an unweighted GPA of 3.0 or above
  • High school sophomores with an unweighted GPA of 3.25 or above
  • All students taking English or math courses will be required to take an online placement test

Dual Enrollment Courses Offered in Eligible Arizona High Schools

COURSE TITLE COURSE DESCRIPTION

ACC-250

Financial Accounting
4 credits

This course is an introduction to the accounting cycle and the construction of financial statements. Explore the fundamental principles and practices of financial accounting as outlined by generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP); the steps in the accounting cycle from journalizing transactions through the preparation of financial statements; and the use and interpretation of the balance sheet, income statement and statement of cash flows. Prerequisite: MAT-134 OR math placement test.

BIB-104

Old Testament Historical Perspectives
4 credits

This course is an introductory historical survey of the Old Testament. Attention is given to the study of the Bible itself, its institutions, its literature and the history of the national life of the Hebrew people from earliest times to the close of the Old Testament period. The course also explores the impact of the Old Testament on the development of Christianity and Christian values.

BIB-105

New Testament Historical Perspective
4 credits

This course is an introductory historical survey of the New Testament, beginning with the Interbiblical period. The main emphasis of this course is the gospels and Acts, and the development of Christian faith and perspectives throughout this historical period.

BIO-155

Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology
3 credits

A study of the basic structure and function of the major systems of the human body, this course focuses on an in-depth exploration of the musculoskeletal and neurological systems for athletic training, health and exercise science majors. This course also compares normal and abnormal function for more comprehensive understanding of the human body. Co-requisite: BIO-155L.

BIO-155L

Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology
1 credit

This lab is designed to complement and support the principles taught in BIO-155. Upon successful completion of the course, you can identify and describe functions, structures and classifications of the skeletal, muscular and organ systems along with related disorders. Co-requisite: BIO-155.

BIO-181

General Biology I
3 credits

This course is a study of biological concepts emphasizing the interplay of structure and function, particularly at the molecular and cellular levels of organization. Cell components and their duties are investigated, as well as the locations of cellular functions within the cell. The importance of the membrane is studied, particularly its roles in controlling movement of ions and molecules and in energy production. The effect of genetic information on the cell is followed through the pathway from DNA to RNA to protein. Co-requisite: BIO-181L.

BIO-181L

General Biology I Lab
1 credit

This lab course is designed to reinforce principles learned in BIO-181 through experiments and activities which complement and enhance understanding of macromolecules, cell membrane properties, cellular components and their contribution to cell structure and function. Assignments are designed to relate cellular processes such as metabolism, cell division and the flow of genetic information to cell structure. Co-requisite: BIO-181.

BIO-182

General Biology I Lab
1 credit

This course is a study of biological concepts emphasizing the interplay of structure and function at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels of organization. Relationships of different life forms are studied, noting characteristics and general lifecycles of the different types of organisms, including bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. Plant structure, function and reproduction are studied, as well as photosynthesis and plant nutrition. Ecological principles are discussed, including organism interactions at the various ecological levels. Principles of conservation are introduced. Prerequisite: BIO-181. Co-requisite: BIO-182L.

BIO-182L

General Biology II Lab
1 credit

This lab is designed to reinforce principles learned in BIO-182. Organisms are examined to help you recognize similarities and differences among different types. Plant structure and processes, including photosynthesis and water transport, are investigated through observation and activities. Concepts of ecology are explored through study of species interactions projects and other activities. Prerequisite: BIO-181L. Co-requisite: BIO-182.

BIO-201

Human Anatomy and Physiology I
3 credits

This course is the first of a two-course sequence examining the structure and function of the human body and mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within it. This portion includes the study of cells, tissues and genetics, as well as the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Co-requisite: BIO-201L.

BIO-201L

Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab
1 credit

This course involves a study of the gross anatomy and functions of the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. This experiential lab involves gaining basic knowledge of the use of human cadavers and computer-assisted instruction. Co-requisite: BIO-201.

BIO-202

Human Anatomy and Physiology II
3 credits

This course is the second of a two-course sequence examining the structure and function of the human body and mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within it. This portion includes the study of immunity; metabolism; energetics; fluid, electrolyte and acid base balance; and the endocrine, hematologic, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Prerequisite: BIO-201 and BIO-201L. Co-requisite: BIO-202L.

BIO-202L

Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
1 credit

This course is a study of the gross anatomy and functions of the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, renal and reproductive systems. The experiential lab involves an advanced exploration of concepts using human cadavers, animal demonstrations and computer-assisted instruction. Prerequisite: BIO 201 and BIO 201L. Co-requisite: BIO 202.

BIO-205

Microbiology
3 credits

This course provides an introduction to the principles and applications of microbiology and a study of the general characteristics of microorganisms, their activities and their relationship to humans. You develop an understanding of microbial cell structure and function, microbial genetics, related pathologies, immunity and other selected applied areas. Co-requisite: BIO-205L.

BIO-205L

Microbiology Lab
1 credit

The laboratory section of BIO-205 supports further learning surrounding principles gained in the lecture course. Develop fundamental skills in microbiological laboratory techniques, microscopy methodologies and the isolation and identification of pathogenic microorganisms. Co-requisite: BIO-205.

BIO-220

Environmental Science
4 credits

This course examines the risks and the environmental impact of human behavior and population growth on natural resources. Emphasis is placed on a holistic approach to environmental science using hands-on exercises, environmental surveys and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles.

BUS-232

Introduction to Sports Management
4 credits

This course is an overview of the business of sports, including career opportunities, as well as a study of the value of professional management to sports organizations.

CHM-101

Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry
3 credits

An introduction to the principles of chemistry; designed for students without a strong background in science. Topics covered include a survey of the chemical and physical properties of elements and compounds, chemical reactions, chemical energetics, acids and bases and chemical bonding. An introduction to organic and biochemistry emphasizes the relationship between molecular structure and function. Co-requisite: CHM-101L.

CHM-101L

Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry Lab
1 credit

This lab course is designed to complement and support the principles being addressed in CHM-101. Learn basic lab techniques related to general and organic chemistry, building upon and strengthening foundational knowledge such as stoichiometry and reaction types. Additionally, some topics are addressed from a biochemical standpoint to highlight application to daily living. Co-requisite: CHM-101.

CHM-113

General Chemistry I
3 credits

This is the first course of a two-semester introduction to chemistry intended for those pursuing careers in the health professions and others desiring a firm foundation in chemistry. The course assumes no prior knowledge of chemistry and begins with basic concepts. Topics include an introduction to the scientific method, dimensional analysis, atomic structure, nomenclature, stoichiometry and chemical reactions, the gas laws, thermodynamics, chemical bonding and properties of solutions. Prerequisites: MAT-134 or math placement test. Co-requisite: CHM-113L.

CHM-115

General Chemistry II
3 credits

This is the second course of a two-semester introduction to chemistry intended for those pursuing careers in the health professions and others desiring a firm foundation in chemistry. Upon successful completion of this course, you are able to demonstrate knowledge and/or skill in solving problems involving the principles of chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium and thermodynamics; understanding chemical reactions using kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics; comparing and contrasting the principal theories of acids and bases; solving equilibrium involving acids, bases and buffers; describing solubility equilibrium; describing terms associated with electrochemistry and solving problems associated with electrochemistry; and describing fundamentals and applications of nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHM-113 and CHM-113L. Co-requisite: CHM-115L.

CHM-115L

General Chemistry II Lab
1 credit

The laboratory section of CHM-115 reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. Experiments include determination of rate law, examples of Le Châtelier's principle, the use of pH indicators, buffer preparation, experimental determination of thermodynamic quantities, the use of electrochemical cells and qualitative and quantitative analysis. Prerequisite: CHM-113 and CHM-113L. Co-requisites: CHM-115.

COM-126

Communications and the Media
4 credits

This course is a study of media history and theory with an emphasis on the implications and impact of mass messages on meaning, culture and society.

COM-151

History and Criticism of Visual Media
4 credits

This course presents the history of visual art and its connection and influence on modern media. Gain an artistic vocabulary by becoming familiar with many kinds of visual art, developing your skills in visual analysis, increasing your understanding of aesthetic theory and applying that understanding in presentations. Prerequisite COM-126.

COM-210

Public Speaking
4 credits

This basic course in oral communication uses focused content to practice the principles of effective oral presentation. The lectures, speaking assignments and all written work will acquaint you with the theory, practice and necessary technological literacy required for effective message building and presentation.

COM-231

Persuasive Theory
4 credits

This course is a study of the theory and practice of communication as it relates to influencing attitude and behavioral change. The course begins by presenting a historical overview of persuasive theory from its classical beginnings and progresses to analyzing persuasive strategies and their use by contemporary practitioners. Examples for analysis are taken from advertising, public relations, religion, sales, politics and propaganda.

CWV-101

Foundations of a Christian Worldview
4 credits

A worldview acts like glasses through which one views the world. In this course, you explore the big questions that make up a worldview, like "Why are we here?" and "What is my purpose?" Examine how Christians answer these questions and work on exploring your own worldview, while learning how a worldview influences your perceptions, decision-making and everyday life.

DDN-100

Survey of the Visual Arts
4 credits

This survey course introduces you to theoretical foundations of the visual arts and cultures. Modes of cultural production are explored-including art, photography, film and design-with focus on influential artists, critics and theoreticians. Begin to identify, form and critically support your own visual interests and opinions in relation to the diverse and changing nature of contemporary culture. Additional purchase of graphics software may be required.

DDN-105

Drawing for the Visual Arts
4 credits

Drawing, sketching for clients and preparing storyboards are essential skills in a visual world that communicates through pictures. This beginning drawing course teaches you about rendering spatial relationships, perspective, light, shadow, texture and forms. This foundational course includes lectures, drawing, critiques and discussions. You do not need to have an art background. Additional purchase of graphics software may be required.

DDN-110

Design Fundamentals
4 credits

This course is an introduction to the basic elements of design and processes of visual communication using graphic tools standard in the industry. The focus is on mastering pixel, vector and layout tools to demonstrate two‐dimensional graphics, images, symbols, color theory, typography and composition. Additional purchase of graphics software may be required.

DFP-101

Introduction to Cinema: History & Aesthetics
4 credits

This course covers multiple eras and movements throughout the age of film. Additional purchase of graphics software may be required.

DFP-111

Digital Video Production I
4 credits

This course introduces you to the technical and aesthetic aspects of small format digital production as well as the basic principles of motion picture production. Learn the language of film/digital video and how its manipulation can express your individual message or purpose. Additional purchase of graphics software may be required.

DFP-113

Film Financing, Budgeting and Distribution
4 credits

This course is an intense overview of the entire process beyond the creation of a production. Review film financing, contracting, budgeting, insurance, etc. Additional purchase of graphics software may be required.

ECH-125

Foundations of Early Childhood
4 credits

This course focuses on the fundamental basis of the field of early childhood education, including historical and philosophical foundations, current practices, ethics, models of teaching and application in early childhood settings. Professional preparation requirements and professional development opportunities for early childhood educators are explored. Practicum/field experience hours: 20. Prerequisite: fingerprint clearance.

ECN-220

Introduction to Economics
4 credits

The course covers microeconomic topics, macroeconomic topics and international economics topics. Microeconomic topics include the nature and method of economics, supply and demand, utility and supply and demand elasticities. Macroeconomic topics include the measurement of national output, factors that impact output, other means of measuring national wealth and economic well-being, unemployment, inflation, GDP accounting and business cycles. While the focus of this course is primarily on the U.S. economy, some comparative economic analysis are covered. In addition, select topics related to international trade and finance are introduced.
COURSE TITLE COURSE DESCRIPTION

EDU-210

Foundations of Education
4 credits

This course is designed to provide an overview of the education profession. A brief survey of the philosophical, historical and sociological influences upon which educational theories and practices are constructed is presented. Explore a variety of the common issues, trends and opportunities that professional educators face in the field. No practicum/field experience required. No fingerprint clearance necessary.

EDU-230

Cultural Diversity in the Classroom
4 credits

This course examines the relationship of cultural values to the formation of self-concept and learning styles. The roles of prejudice, stereotyping and cultural incompatibilities in education are also evaluated. No fingerprint clearance necessary.

ENG-105

English Composition I
4 credits

This is a course in writing academic prose, including various types of essays, arguments and constructions. Placement test required.

ENG-106

English Composition II
4 credits

This course explores various types of research writing, with a focus on constructing essays, arguments and research reports based on primary and secondary sources. Prerequisite: ENG-105.

ENG-250

Analysis of World Literature
4 credits

This course is a study of some diverse works in world literature. It introduces all advanced English course offerings. You are also introduced to methods of literary criticism and analysis. All students who plan to major in English should earn a 3.0 or above in this course before taking any upper division English courses. Prerequisite: ENG-105 and ENG-106.

ENG-260

English Literature I
4 credits

This course is a survey of English Literature from the Old English period through the Enlightenment. Prerequisite: ENG-105 and ENG-106; ENG-250 for English majors.

ENG-270

English Literature II
4 credits

This course is a continuation of ENG-260, covering the Romantic period through the Modern period. Prerequisite: ENG-105 and ENG-106; ENG-250 for English majors.

GOV-140

American Government and Politics
4 credits

This course is an introduction to American government and politics. It covers the constitutional foundations and governing institutions of the federal government. Throughout the course, you address common political themes, such as the nature and scope of governance, democracy, citizenship and patterns of political behavior.

GOV-210

Introduction to Comparative Government and International Politics
4 credits

This course compares and contrasts various systems of government in Western and non-Western countries, and explores political and diplomatic processes and how they affect international relations, nations and localities.

HIS-105

World History Themes
4 credits

This course surveys global civilizations from Africa and the Americas to Eurasia as an overview of the principal cultural, political and economic themes that shaped world civilization.

HIS-144

United States History Themes
4 credits

This course provides an overview of the principal political, economic and cultural themes that shaped the U.S. from the Colonial period into the 20th century.

INT-244

World Religions
4 credits

This course is a study of the major contemporary religions of the world, including Abrahamic religions, Eastern religions and other religions. The course covers religious texts, historical background and current beliefs and practices. Emphasis is given to the ideological foundations of a Christian worldview, a comparison of worldviews and the application of worldviews within a global society.

JUS-104

Introduction to Justice Studies
4 credits

This course provides an introduction to the basic components of the criminal justice system in the U.S. today: corrections, courts and law enforcement.

JUS-110

Crime and Criminology
4 credits

This course provides an examination of classic and contemporary theories of crime causation, including psychological and social causes of crime and theories of punishment.

JUS-250

Critical Issues in Criminal Justice
4 credits

This course provides an examination of issues relating to justice policies, perspectives, techniques, roles, institutional arrangement, management and administration, use of research and innovative patterns. Prerequisite: JUS-104 and JUS-110.

MAT-110

Basics of Algebra
4 credits

This course begins with a review of basic mathematical concepts such as operations with fractions, decimals, percents and real numbers; exponents; order of operations; and simplifying expressions. It then continues with an introduction to algebraic concepts such as solving linear equations and inequalities; graphing linear equations and inequalities; system of linear equations; operations on, factoring and solving polynomials; and basics of functions. The course is meant to serve as a foundation for further studies in applications of algebra. (Note: This is a developmental course and credits do not transfer.)

MAT-134

Applications of Algebra
4 credits

This course is the university general education requirement. It develops and then applies the algebraic concepts of linear equations and linear inequalities in one variable; graphing linear equations and linear inequalities; linear systems; and rational, exponential, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic equations. There is an emphasis on developing both a fundamental understanding of these concepts as well as their application to real-world problem solving. Placement test is required OR grade of C or better in MAT-110.

MAT-250

College Algebra and Trigonometry
4 credits

This course is a unified study of fundamental concepts from algebra and trigonometry that provides the necessary background for the study of calculus. Topics include modeling linear equations and inequalities; functions and their graphs; polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices and determinants; and conic sections. There is an emphasis on developing both a fundamental understanding of these concepts as well as their application to real-world problem-solving. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in MAT-134 or placement test.

MAT-252

Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
4 credits

This course provides a rigorous treatment of the concepts, methods and applications of elementary calculus and is the first calculus course in a three-course sequence. Topics include a brief review of linear, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse functions; understanding and calculating limits, continuity and derivatives as rates of change; differentiation rules including derivatives of polynomials, exponentials, trigonometric and logarithmic functions; product and quotient rules, the chain rule and implicit differentiation; related rates, curve sketching, maximum and minimum problems, mean value theorem, linear approximation, indeterminate forms and L'Hospital's rule; and applied optimization problems, antiderivatives and approximating areas under the curve. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT-250 or placement test.

MAT-253

Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
4 credits

This course provides a rigorous treatment of the concepts, methods and applications of integral calculus and is the second course in a three-course sequence. Topics include definite integrals, fundamental theorem of calculus and integration rules; arc length, solids of revolution and physical applications; techniques of integration including improper integrals and an introduction to differential equations; polar coordinates, parametric equations, infinite sequences and series; power series and conic sections; and vector arithmetic, dot product and projections. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT-252 or placement test.

MAT-260

College Geometry
4 credits

This course is an introduction to Euclidean geometry and mathematical proofs, including theorems and proofs, set theory, logic, congruent and similar polygons, circles, geometric constructions, areas, volumes, geometric loci, elementary logic and deductive reasoning. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT-134 or placement test.

MAT-274

Probability and Statistics
4 credits

This course provides an introduction to the study of basic probability, descriptive and inferential statistics and decision-making. Emphasis is placed on measures of central tendency and dispersion, correlation, regression, discrete and continuous probability distributions, quality control, population parameter estimation and hypothesis testing.

MGT-240

Introduction to Management
4 credits

This introductory course deals with management and the basic management processes and functions. It focuses on real-world management situations concerned with planning, organizing, leading and controlling the work of the organization.

MKT-245

Principles of Marketing
4 credits

This course surveys the marketing mix and marketing concept; markets and buyer behavior; product, service and relationship marketing for global competition; creating and keeping customers in an e-commerce world; branding and positioning; distribution strategies, integrated marketing communications and pricing strategies.

PHI-103

Introduction to Philosophy and Ethics
4 credits

This course is an introduction to the discipline of philosophy through a study of representative philosophical problems. You are introduced to analytic tools that enable you to practice critical thinking, evaluate knowledge claims and establish a rationale and justification for other academic disciplines. Topics to be considered include logic, epistemology, metaphysics and ethics.

PHY-102

Introduction to Physical Science
4 credits

This course introduces you to the scientific method. You are expected to classify objects and materials based on physical and chemical properties, as well as develop an understanding of chemical reactions and flow of energy in a system.

PHY-104

Earth and Space Science
4 credits

This course is designed to develop your skills in the scientific method, develop the understanding of the properties of Earth and its materials and appreciate Earth in relationship to other objects in space. Concepts include geological and atmospheric phenomena.

PHY-111

General Physics I
3 credits

This course is a study of basic concepts of physics, including motion; forces; energy; the properties of solids, liquids and gases; and heat and thermodynamics. The mathematics used includes algebra, trigonometry and vector analysis. A primary course goal is to build a functional knowledge that allows you to more fully understand the physical world and to apply that understanding to other areas of the natural and mathematical sciences. Conceptual, visual, graphical and mathematical models of physical phenomena are stressed. You build critical thinking skills by engaging in individual and group problem-solving sessions. Prerequisites: MAT-250 or math placement test. Co-requisite: PHY-111L.

PHY-111L

General Physics I Lab
1 credit

This course utilizes lab experimentation to practice concepts of physical principles introduced in the PHY-111 lecture course. You perform the proper analysis and calculations to arrive at the correct quantifiable result when confronted with equations involving gravity, sound, energy and motion. Prerequisite: MAT-250 or math placement test. Co-requisite: PHY-111.

PHY-112

General Physics II
3 credits

This course is the second in a one-year introductory physics sequence. In this course, the basics of three areas in physics are covered, including electricity and magnetism, optics and modern physics. The sequence of topics includes an introduction to electric and magnetic fields. This is followed by the nature of light as an electromagnetic wave and topics associated with geometric optics. The final topic discussed in the course is quantum mechanics. Prerequisite: PHY-111 and PHY-111L. Co-requisite: PHY-112L.

PHY-112L

General Physics II Lab
1 credit

This course utilizes lab experimentation to practice concepts of physical principles introduced in the PHY-112 lecture course. Some of the topics you analyze involve the relationship between electric charges and insulators/conductors, magnetism in physics, energy transformations in electric circuits, the relationship between magnetism and electricity and how they relate to the medical industry. Prerequisite: PHY-111 and PHY-111L. Co-requisite: PHY-112.

PSY-102

General Psychology
4 credits

This foundation course in the science of behavior includes an overview of the history of psychology, the brain, motivation, emotion, sensory functions, perception, intelligence, gender and sexuality, social psychology, human development, learning psychopathology and therapy.

PSY-255

Personality Psychology
4 credits

This course is a study of the nature and causal determinants of human behavior, including the definition and scientific measurement of personality. Theories studied include the psychodynamic, neo-Freudian, trait and factor, cognitive and behavioral theories. The Christian perspective on the nature of human personality is also explored. Prerequisite: PSY-102.

SOC-102

Principles of Sociology
4 credits

This course presents a survey of the concepts, theories and methods used by sociologists to describe and explain the effects of social structure on human behavior. It emphasizes the understanding and use of the sociological perspective in everyday life.

SPA-104

Elementary Spanish I
4 credits

This course builds a foundation in the language development skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. The course textbook is supported by an extensive workbook and online lab which allows you to hear Spanish spoken by native speakers. Practice spoken Spanish through face-to-face activities or by recorded wave files. Additionally, you are prompted to growth in global awareness through participation in cultural events in your community, reviewing movies set in Hispanic cultural settings and reading books in English by Hispanic authors about Hispanic culture.

SPA-105

Elementary Spanish II
4 credits

This course is a continuation of SPA-104. Prerequisite: SPA-104 or equivalent.
teacher in classroom
students in gcu library

Dual Enrollment Courses Offered Online

COURSE TITLE COURSE DESCRIPTION

ACC-250

Financial Accounting
4 credits

This course is an introduction to the accounting cycle and the construction of financial statements. Explore the fundamental principles and practices of financial accounting as outlined by generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP); the steps in the accounting cycle from journalizing transactions through the preparation of financial statements; and the use and interpretation of the balance sheet, income statement and statement of cash flows. Prerequisite: MAT-134 OR math placement test.

BIB-104

Old Testament Historical Perspectives
4 credits

This course is an introductory historical survey of the Old Testament. Attention is given to the study of the Bible itself, its institutions, its literature and the history of the national life of the Hebrew people from earliest times to the close of the Old Testament period. The course also explores the impact of the Old Testament on the development of Christianity and Christian values.

BIB-105

New Testament Historical Perspective
4 credits

This course is an introductory historical survey of the New Testament, beginning with the Interbiblical period. The main emphasis of this course is the gospels and Acts, and the development of Christian faith and perspectives throughout this historical period.

BIO-220

Environmental Science
4 credits

This course examines the risks and the environmental impact of human behavior and population growth on natural resources. Emphasis is placed on a holistic approach to environmental science using hands-on exercises, environmental surveys and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles.

BUS-232

Introduction to Sports Management
4 credits

This course is an overview of the business of sports, including career opportunities, as well as a study of the value of professional management to sports organizations.

COM-126

Communications and the Media
4 credits

The laboratory section of CHM-115 reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. Experiments include determination of rate law, examples of Le Châtelier's principle, the use of pH indicators, buffer preparation, experimental determination of thermodynamic quantities, the use of electrochemical cells and qualitative and quantitative analysis. Prerequisite: CHM-113 and CHM-113L. Co-requisites: CHM-115.

COM-126

Communications and the Media
4 credits

This course is a study of media history and theory with an emphasis on the implications and impact of mass messages on meaning, culture and society.

COM-151

History and Criticism of Visual Media
4 credits

This course presents the history of visual art and its connection and influence on modern media. Gain an artistic vocabulary by becoming familiar with many kinds of visual art, developing your skills in visual analysis, increasing your understanding of aesthetic theory and applying that understanding in presentations. Prerequisite COM-126.

COM-231

Persuasive Theory
4 credits

This course is a study of the theory and practice of communication as it relates to influencing attitude and behavioral change. The course begins by presenting a historical overview of persuasive theory from its classical beginnings and progresses to analyzing persuasive strategies and their use by contemporary practitioners. Examples for analysis are taken from advertising, public relations, religion, sales, politics and propaganda.

CWV-101

Foundations of a Christian Worldview
4 credits

A worldview acts like glasses through which one views the world. In this course, you explore the big questions that make up a worldview, like "Why are we here?" and "What is my purpose?" Examine how Christians answer these questions and work on exploring your own worldview, while learning how a worldview influences your perceptions, decision-making and everyday life.

DFP-101

Introduction to Cinema: History & Aesthetics
4 credits

This course covers multiple eras and movements throughout the age of film. Additional purchase of graphics software may be required.

DFP-111

Digital Video Production I
4 credits

This course introduces you to the technical and aesthetic aspects of small format digital production as well as the basic principles of motion picture production. Learn the language of film/digital video and how its manipulation can express your individual message or purpose. Additional purchase of graphics software may be required.

ECH-125

Foundations of Early Childhood
4 credits

This course focuses on the fundamental basis of the field of early childhood education, including historical and philosophical foundations, current practices, ethics, models of teaching and application in early childhood settings. Professional preparation requirements and professional development opportunities for early childhood educators are explored. Practicum/field experience hours: 20. Prerequisite: fingerprint clearance.

ECN-220

Introduction to Economics
4 credits

The course covers microeconomic topics, macroeconomic topics and international economics topics. Microeconomic topics include the nature and method of economics, supply and demand, utility and supply and demand elasticities. Macroeconomic topics include the measurement of national output, factors that impact output, other means of measuring national wealth and economic well-being, unemployment, inflation, GDP accounting and business cycles. While the focus of this course is primarily on the U.S. economy, some comparative economic analysis are covered. In addition, select topics related to international trade and finance are introduced.

EDU-210

Foundations of Education
4 credits

This course is designed to provide an overview of the education profession. A brief survey of the philosophical, historical and sociological influences upon which educational theories and practices are constructed is presented. Explore a variety of the common issues, trends and opportunities that professional educators face in the field. No practicum/field experience required. No fingerprint clearance necessary.

EDU-230

Cultural Diversity in the Classroom
4 credits

This course examines the relationship of cultural values to the formation of self-concept and learning styles. The roles of prejudice, stereotyping and cultural incompatibilities in education are also evaluated. No fingerprint clearance necessary.

ENG-105

English Composition I
4 credits

This is a course in writing academic prose, including various types of essays, arguments and constructions. Placement test required.

ENG-106

English Composition II
4 credits

This course explores various types of research writing, with a focus on constructing essays, arguments and research reports based on primary and secondary sources. Prerequisite: ENG-105.

ENG-250

Analysis of World Literature
4 credits

This course is a study of some diverse works in world literature. It introduces all advanced English course offerings. You are also introduced to methods of literary criticism and analysis. All students who plan to major in English should earn a 3.0 or above in this course before taking any upper division English courses. Prerequisite: ENG-105 and ENG-106.

ENG-260

English Literature I
4 credits

This course is a survey of English Literature from the Old English period through the Enlightenment. Prerequisite: ENG-105 and ENG-106; ENG-250 for English majors.

ENG-270

English Literature II
4 credits

This course is a continuation of ENG-260, covering the Romantic period through the Modern period. Prerequisite: ENG-105 and ENG-106; ENG-250 for English majors.

GOV-140

American Government and Politics
4 credits

This course is an introduction to American government and politics. It covers the constitutional foundations and governing institutions of the federal government. Throughout the course, you address common political themes, such as the nature and scope of governance, democracy, citizenship and patterns of political behavior.
COURSE TITLE COURSE DESCRIPTION

GOV-210

Introduction to Comparative Government and International Politics
4 credits

This course compares and contrasts various systems of government in Western and non-Western countries, and explores political and diplomatic processes and how they affect international relations, nations and localities.

HIS-144

United States History Themes
4 credits

This course provides an overview of the principal political, economic and cultural themes that shaped the U.S. from the Colonial period into the 20th century.

INT-244

World Religions
4 credits

This course is a study of the major contemporary religions of the world, including Abrahamic religions, Eastern religions and other religions. The course covers religious texts, historical background and current beliefs and practices. Emphasis is given to the ideological foundations of a Christian worldview, a comparison of worldviews and the application of worldviews within a global society.

JUS-104

Introduction to Justice Studies
4 credits

This course provides an introduction to the basic components of the criminal justice system in the U.S. today: corrections, courts and law enforcement.

JUS-110

Crime and Criminology
4 credits

This course provides an examination of classic and contemporary theories of crime causation, including psychological and social causes of crime and theories of punishment.

JUS-250

Critical Issues in Criminal Justice
4 credits

This course provides an examination of issues relating to justice policies, perspectives, techniques, roles, institutional arrangement, management and administration, use of research and innovative patterns. Prerequisite: JUS-104 and JUS-110.

MAT-110

Basics of Algebra
4 credits

This course begins with a review of basic mathematical concepts such as operations with fractions, decimals, percents and real numbers; exponents; order of operations; and simplifying expressions. It then continues with an introduction to algebraic concepts such as solving linear equations and inequalities; graphing linear equations and inequalities; system of linear equations; operations on, factoring and solving polynomials; and basics of functions. The course is meant to serve as a foundation for further studies in applications of algebra. (Note: This is a developmental course and credits do not transfer.)

MAT-134

Applications of Algebra
4 credits

This course is the university general education requirement. It develops and then applies the algebraic concepts of linear equations and linear inequalities in one variable; graphing linear equations and linear inequalities; linear systems; and rational, exponential, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic equations. There is an emphasis on developing both a fundamental understanding of these concepts as well as their application to real-world problem solving. Placement test is required OR grade of C or better in MAT-110.

MAT-250

College Algebra and Trigonometry
4 credits

This course is a unified study of fundamental concepts from algebra and trigonometry that provides the necessary background for the study of calculus. Topics include modeling linear equations and inequalities; functions and their graphs; polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices and determinants; and conic sections. There is an emphasis on developing both a fundamental understanding of these concepts as well as their application to real-world problem-solving. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in MAT-134 or placement test.

MAT-252

Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
4 credits

This course provides a rigorous treatment of the concepts, methods and applications of elementary calculus and is the first calculus course in a three-course sequence. Topics include a brief review of linear, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse functions; understanding and calculating limits, continuity and derivatives as rates of change; differentiation rules including derivatives of polynomials, exponentials, trigonometric and logarithmic functions; product and quotient rules, the chain rule and implicit differentiation; related rates, curve sketching, maximum and minimum problems, mean value theorem, linear approximation, indeterminate forms and L'Hospital's rule; and applied optimization problems, antiderivatives and approximating areas under the curve. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT-250 or placement test.

MAT-253

Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
4 credits

This course provides a rigorous treatment of the concepts, methods and applications of integral calculus and is the second course in a three-course sequence. Topics include definite integrals, fundamental theorem of calculus and integration rules; arc length, solids of revolution and physical applications; techniques of integration including improper integrals and an introduction to differential equations; polar coordinates, parametric equations, infinite sequences and series; power series and conic sections; and vector arithmetic, dot product and projections. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT-252 or placement test.

MAT-274

Probability and Statistics
4 credits

This course provides an introduction to the study of basic probability, descriptive and inferential statistics and decision-making. Emphasis is placed on measures of central tendency and dispersion, correlation, regression, discrete and continuous probability distributions, quality control, population parameter estimation and hypothesis testing.

MGT-240

Introduction to Management
4 credits

This introductory course deals with management and the basic management processes and functions. It focuses on real-world management situations concerned with planning, organizing, leading and controlling the work of the organization.

MKT-245

Principles of Marketing
4 credits

This course surveys the marketing mix and marketing concept; markets and buyer behavior; product, service and relationship marketing for global competition; creating and keeping customers in an e-commerce world; branding and positioning; distribution strategies, integrated marketing communications and pricing strategies.

PHY-102

Introduction to Physical Science
4 credits

This course introduces you to the scientific method. You are expected to classify objects and materials based on physical and chemical properties, as well as develop an understanding of chemical reactions and flow of energy in a system.

PHY-104

Earth and Space Science
4 credits

This course is designed to develop your skills in the scientific method, develop the understanding of the properties of Earth and its materials and appreciate Earth in relationship to other objects in space. Concepts include geological and atmospheric phenomena.

PSY-102

General Psychology
4 credits

This foundation course in the science of behavior includes an overview of the history of psychology, the brain, motivation, emotion, sensory functions, perception, intelligence, gender and sexuality, social psychology, human development, learning psychopathology and therapy.

PSY-255

Personality Psychology
4 credits

This course is a study of the nature and causal determinants of human behavior, including the definition and scientific measurement of personality. Theories studied include the psychodynamic, neo-Freudian, trait and factor, cognitive and behavioral theories. The Christian perspective on the nature of human personality is also explored. Prerequisite: PSY-102.

SOC-102

Principles of Sociology
4 credits

This course presents a survey of the concepts, theories and methods used by sociologists to describe and explain the effects of social structure on human behavior. It emphasizes the understanding and use of the sociological perspective in everyday life.

Dual Enrollment Instructors

GCU is committed to ensuring that students experience the same level of instruction, resources and rigor that our traditional student body receives so they will be prepared to move to the next academic level of study when they enter college.

Dual Enrollment instructors provide instruction that incorporates best practices in teaching, technology, engagements, ethics and more in a specific content area. GCU works with instructors to provide academic support, curriculum approval and monitoring of the course effectiveness. Dual Enrollment instructors receive ongoing training, support and professional development from GCU faculty.

Instructor Requirements

  • Master's degree or higher in the content area or a Master's degree with nine graduate hours (500+) in the content area
  • Exceptional Expertise qualifications set and approved by the colleges
  • Completed online dual enrollment adjunct faculty application with resumé and unofficial transcripts (official transcripts are required for final approval)

Curriculum Approval

  • Create syllabus that incorporates university templates, standards and objectives into current curriculum
  • Utilize university benchmark exams/assignments and grading rubrics
  • Provide course materials for approval

For more information regarding dual enrollment, please contact us at 855-GCU-LOPE.