BS in Computer Science: Business Entrepreneurship Emphasis

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science with an Emphasis in Business Entrepreneurship

Offered By: College of Engineering and Technology

Blend your passion for computer science with your inclinations toward entrepreneurship with this innovative computer science degree with a business entrepreneurship emphasis. The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science with an Emphasis in Business Entrepreneurship degree at Grand Canyon University (GCU) teaches you to plan, design and optimize technology while instilling a wide range of skills in project management and business entrepreneurism.

This degree may be an excellent choice for individuals who are interested in merging technical expertise with the know-how needed to launch and manage an enterprise. If you envision using your technical knowledge to create innovative products, services or business models, this program may be tailored to fuel your ambitions. Embrace your passion for computer science and entrepreneurial spirit with this degree at GCU.

Choose a BS in Computer Science Degree: Business Entrepreneurship Emphasis From GCU

Through hands-on learning and industry-relevant projects, you'll be taught to innovate and create new products, services and business models. Whether you dream of launching your own tech startup, driving innovation in established companies or spearheading technological advancements, this program is carefully crafted to empower you to reach your full potential.

As a private Christian university, GCU emphasizes the role of the Christian worldview in the development of servant leadership qualities. As a computer science major with a business entrepreneurship emphasis at GCU, a strong focus is placed on ethics and morality in the workplace. 

Knowledgeable instructors in the business and computer science fields support you as you enhance your knowledge in topic areas such as discrete mathematics, Boolean algebra, finite state machines and object-oriented programming. Other core competencies for this computer science business emphasis degree include:

  • Innovation in product development
  • Design and implementation of database solutions 
  • Current trends in computer science
  • Information security and project management
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25%

Estimated job growth for software developers, quality assurance analysts and testers from 2022 to 2023.1

Gain Skills in Entrepreneurship Business and Computer Science

The program combines purpose-driven classroom instruction with practical project experience. This imparts graduates the foundational knowledge and hands-on application skills necessary in the business and computer science industry, including sharp critical thinking skills, professional communication abilities and ethical servant leadership skills. 

This BS in Computer Science with a business entrepreneurship emphasis is an intensive survey of the fundamentals of computer science, including operating systems, digital logic, algorithms and information security. You will be taught the framework for pursuing an entrepreneurial path that promotes innovation in product development, work environments and internal processes.

As a computer science major with a business entrepreneurship emphasis student, you are required to complete a capstone project that spans your entire senior year. The computer science capstone projects are designed to inspire you to apply research as you design projects in your area of interest.

Combine Computer Science and Business Major Entrepreneurship Topics

Combining these topics is an innovative approach that equips you with a diverse set of skills to thrive in the digital era. The integration of computer science and business can prepare you to create valuable solutions that address complex problems in various industries. With a focus on entrepreneurship, this degree guides students to start their own businesses or become valuable contributors to existing enterprises.

This degree is designed to train you to become an ethical professional who is committed to pursuing innovative excellence in the workplace. Some of the course topics you will study that combine entrepreneurship topics with computer science include:

  • Strategic planning for business owners and entrepreneurs
  • Information security business execution 
  • Ethical and effective communication in STEM professions
  • Entrepreneurship and innovation

Career Paths With a BS in Computer Science: Business Entrepreneurship Emphasis

Business and computer science is a dynamic and versatile career field. Computer science graduates with a business emphasis may be prepared to work in a variety of industries and in a diverse range of settings, including private corporations, governmental agencies and nonprofit organizations. Some of the specific job titles that may be related to this degree include the following:

  • Computer programmer
  • Software developer
  • Web developer
  • Computer and information systems manager
  • Information security analyst
  • Computer and information research scientist
  • Computer network support specialist
  • Database architect
  • Software quality assurance analyst and tester
  • Web and digital interface designer
  • Data scientist
  • Postsecondary computer science teacher 

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook estimates job growth for computer systems analysts to increase by about 10% from 2022 to 2032, faster than average, accounting for an estimated increase of 51,100 jobs in the field.2 For  that same time period, job growth for software developers, quality assurance analysts and testers is on track to grow by about 25%, accounting for an estimated increase of 451,200 jobs in the field.1

Overall, a computer science degree with a business entrepreneurship emphasis can provide you with a unique set of skills and knowledge that can lead to many career opportunities in the technology and business sectors.

Earn an Accredited Computer Science Degree: Business Entrepreneurship Emphasis

Students in this program can progress through sequentially arranged coursework that is in-depth in nature and broad in scope. This multidisciplinary degree covers relevant topics in science and human-computer interaction. A thoughtful blend of instruction and lab work enables students to practice what they learn in IT project management, computer design and computer graphics.

The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science with an Emphasis in Business Entrepreneurship program is accredited by the Computer Science Accreditation Commission of ABET

For more information on the accreditation of computer science programs and other university licensures, please visit our University Accreditation and Regulations Page.

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FAQs for the BS in Computer Science: Business Entrepreneurship Emphasis 

If you are considering pursuing a degree that combines technical and business skills, this section will provide you with answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about this field of study. Find out if this program is right for you.

If you have a passion for starting your own business and want to develop the skills and knowledge to become an entrepreneur, this computer science business emphasis can be well worth your investment. With a combination of technical and business skills, graduates of this program may be able to effectively navigate the challenges of launching a technology startup. Furthermore, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual wage for computer systems analysts was $102,240 in May 2022.3

This program requires a total of 128 credits for completion. Most of the classes are 15 weeks in length. Fill out the form on this page to speak to a university counselor to better understand how long it takes to earn your degree.

The computer science business entrepreneurship emphasis from GCU can be a challenging degree program, as it requires you to develop proficiency in both technical and business subjects. You will be met with topics such as computer programming, algorithms and data structures, as well as business management, marketing and finance. 

If your goal is to start your own technology-based business, a computer science degree with a business entrepreneurship emphasis can both challenge and highlight your talents. Enroll today and become a driving force in the world of technology and entrepreneurship. 

1 COVID -19 has adversely affected the global economy and data from 2020 and 2021 may be atypical compared to prior years. The pandemic may impact the predicted future workforce outcomes indicated by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics as well. Accordingly, data shown is effective September 2023, which can be found here: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Software Developers, Quality Assurance Analysts and Testers, retrieved on Sept. 18, 2023. 

2 COVID -19 has adversely affected the global economy and data from 2020 and 2021 may be atypical compared to prior years. The pandemic may impact the predicted future workforce outcomes indicated by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics as well. Accordingly, data shown is effective September 2023, which can be found here: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Computer System Analyst, retrieved on Sept. 18, 2023. 

3 The earnings referenced were reported by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Computer Systems Analysts as of May 2022, retrieved on Sept. 18, 2023. Due to COVID-19, data from 2020 and 2021 may be atypical compared to prior years. The pandemic may also impact the predicted future workforce outcomes indicated by the BLS. BLS calculates the median using salaries of workers from across the country with varying levels of education and experience and does not reflect the earnings of GCU graduates as computer systems analysts. It does not reflect earnings of workers in one city or region of the country. It also does not reflect a typical entry-level salary. Median income is the statistical midpoint for the range of salaries in a specific occupation. It represents what you would earn if you were paid more money than half the workers in an occupation, and less than half the workers in an occupation. It may give you a basis to estimate what you might earn at some point if you enter this career. You may also wish to compare median salaries if you are considering more than one career path. Grand Canyon University can make no guarantees on individual graduates’ salaries as the employer the graduate chooses to apply to, and accept employment from, determines salary not only based on education, but also individual characteristics and skills and fit to that organization (among other categories) against a pool of candidates. 

TOTAL CREDITS & COURSE LENGTH:
Total Credits: 128
Campus: 15 weeks
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TRANSFER CREDITS:
Up to 90 credits, only 84 can be lower division
TUITION RATE:
Campus: $8,250 per semester [More Info]

Course List

General Education Requirements:
34-40 credits
Major:
88 credits
Open Elective Credits:
0-6 credits
Degree Requirements:
128 credits

General Education Requirements

General Education coursework prepares Grand Canyon University graduates to think critically, communicate clearly, live responsibly in a diverse world, and thoughtfully integrate their faith and ethical convictions into all dimensions of life. These competencies, essential to an effective and satisfying life, are outlined in the General Education Learner Outcomes. General Education courses embody the breadth of human understanding and creativity contained in the liberal arts and sciences tradition. Students take an array of foundational knowledge courses that promote expanded knowledge, insight, and the outcomes identified in the University's General Education Competencies. The knowledge and skills students acquire through these courses serve as a foundation for successful careers and lifelong journeys of growing understanding and wisdom.

Requirements

Upon completion of the Grand Canyon University's University Foundation experience, students will be able to demonstrate competency in the areas of academic skills and self-leadership. They will be able to articulate the range of resources available to assist them, explore career options related to their area of study, and have knowledge of Grand Canyon's community. Students will be able to demonstrate foundational academic success skills, explore GCU resources (CLA, Library, Career Center, ADA office, etc), articulate strategies of self-leadership and management and recognize opportunities to engage in the GCU community.

Course Options

  • UNV-112, Success in Science, Engineering and Technology & Lab: 4
  • UNV-103, University Success: 4
  • UNV-303, University Success: 4
  • UNV-108, University Success in the College of Education: 4

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to construct rhetorically effective communications appropriate to diverse audiences, purposes, and occasions (English composition, communication, critical reading, foreign language, sign language, etc.). Students are required to take 3 credits of English grammar or composition.

Course Options

  • UNV-104, 21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Literacy: 4
  • ENG-105, English Composition I: 4
  • ENG-106, English Composition II: 4

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to express aspects of Christian heritage and worldview. Students are required to take CWV-101/CWV-301.

Course Options

  • CWV-101, Christian Worldview: 4
  • CWV-301, Christian Worldview: 4

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to use various analytic and problem-solving skills to examine, evaluate, and/or challenge ideas and arguments (mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, geology, astronomy, physical geography, ecology, economics, theology, logic, philosophy, technology, statistics, accounting, etc.). Students are required to take 3 credits of intermediate algebra or higher.

Course Options

  • MAT-154, Applications of College Algebra: 4
  • MAT-144, College Mathematics: 4
  • PHI-105, 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving: 4
  • BIO-220, Environmental Science: 4

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to demonstrate awareness and appreciation of and empathy for differences in arts and culture, values, experiences, historical perspectives, and other aspects of life (psychology, sociology, government, Christian studies, Bible, geography, anthropology, economics, political science, child and family studies, law, ethics, cross-cultural studies, history, art, music, dance, theater, applied arts, literature, health, etc.). If the predefined course is a part of the major, students need to take an additional course.

Course Options

  • HIS-144, U.S. History Themes: 4
  • PSY-102, General Psychology: 4
  • SOC-100, Everyday Sociology: 4

Required General Education Courses

Course Description

This course presents the fundamentals of algebra and trigonometry with some applications; it provides the background and introduction for the study of calculus. Topics include review of linear equations and inequalities in one and multiple variables; functions and their graphs; polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; systems of equations and matrices; and sequences and series. Slope and rate of change are introduced to set up the concepts of limits and derivatives. There is an emphasis on both an understanding of the mathematical concepts involved as well as their applications to the principles and real-world problems encountered in science and engineering. Technology is utilized to facilitate problem analysis and graphing. Prerequisite: MAT-134 or MAT-154.

Course Description

This course provides a rigorous treatment of the concepts and methods of elementary calculus and its application to real-world problems. Topics include differentiation, optimization, and integration.  Software is utilized to facilitate problem analysis and graphing. Prerequisite: MAT-261 or ESG-162/162L.

Course Description

This course is a study of biological concepts emphasizing the interplay of structure and function, particularly at the molecular and cellular levels of organization. Cell components and their duties are investigated, as well as the locations of cellular functions within the cell. The importance of the membrane is studied, particularly its roles in controlling movement of ions and molecules and in energy production. The effect of genetic information on the cell is followed through the pathway from DNA to RNA to protein. Co-requisite: BIO-181L.

Course Description

This lab course is designed to reinforce principles learned in BIO-181 through experiments and activities which complement and enhance understanding of macromolecules, cell membrane properties, cellular components, and their contribution to cell structure and function. Assignments are designed to relate cellular processes such as metabolism, cell division, and the flow of genetic information to cell structure. Co-requisite: BIO-181.

Course Description

This course reviews the basic principles, tools, and techniques used in computer applications that enable communication, visualization, access to information, learning and entertainment. Students learn the methods of designing, implementing and evaluating techniques for effective communication in a technical, business, education or entertainment context. The laboratory reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture. Hands-on activities focus on experiencing and implementing concepts discussed in the lecture. Students create applications that communicate ideas efficiently and are easy to use. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: CST-201, MAT-262, and (CST-217 or CST-341).

Course Description

This course provides an insight into professional communications and conduct associated with careers in science, engineering and technology. Students learn about the changing modes of communication in these disciplines recognizing the advances in digital communications. They gain practical experience developing and supporting a thesis or position through written, oral, and visual presentations prepared and delivered individually and in groups. Students will explore concepts and issues in professional ethics and conduct such as privacy, discrimination, workplace etiquette, cyber-ethics, network and data security, identity theft, ownership rights and intellectual property. This is a writing intensive course.

Core Courses

Course Description

This course introduces the fundamental concepts and syntax of the Java programming language. The course focuses on object-oriented techniques in Java with an emphasis on problem solving and fundamental algorithms.

Course Description

This course provides an in-depth coverage of object-oriented programming using most current application programming methods, languages, and tools. Students will design, create, run, and debug applications. The course emphasizes the development of correct, well-documented programs using object-oriented programming concepts. Prerequisite: CST-111 or CST-105.

Course Description

This course is a calculus-based study of basic concepts of physics, including motion; forces; energy; the properties of solids, liquids, and gases; and heat and thermodynamics. The mathematics used includes algebra, trigonometry, and vector analysis. A primary course goal is to build a functional knowledge that allows students to more fully understand the physical world and to apply that understanding to other areas of the natural and mathematical sciences. Conceptual, visual, graphical, and mathematical models of physical phenomena are stressed. Students build critical thinking skills by engaging in individual and group problem-solving sessions. Prerequisite: MAT-262. Co-Requisite: PHY-121L.

Course Description

This calculus-based course utilizes lab experimentation to practice concepts of physical principles introduced in the PHY-121 lecture course. Students are able to perform the proper analysis and calculations to arrive at the correct quantifiable result when confronted with equations involving gravity, sound, energy, and motion. Prerequisite: MAT-262. Co-Requisite: PHY-121.

Course Description

This course provides a rigorous treatment of the concepts and methods of integral, multivariable, and vector calculus and its application to real-world problems. Prerequisite: MAT-262.

Course Description

This in an introductory course in discrete mathematics with digital logic. Topics covered include Boolean algebra, circuits, number theory, sequences, recursion, sets, functions, and counting. An emphasis will be placed on writing computer programs that address key concepts discussed in lecture. Prerequisite: MAT-261 or CST-111 or CST-105.

Course Description

This course covers classical algorithms and data structures, with an emphasis on implementation and application in solving real-world computational problems. The course focuses on algorithms for sorting, searching, string processing, and graphs. Students learn basic strategies to evaluate divide-and-conquer, recursive backtracking, and algorithm efficiency. Hands-on activities focus on writing code that implements concepts and algorithm implementation techniques. Prerequisite: CST-210 or CST-239 or CST-135 or CST-250 or CST-227.

Course Description

This course provides students with the technical skills required to design and implement a database solution using a SQL server. Students use data definition language (DDL) to create and delete database objects, and data manipulation language (DML) to access and manipulate those objects. Students gain hands-on experience with database design, data normalization, SQL sub-queries, creating and using views, understanding and working with data dictionaries, and loading and unloading databases. The laboratory reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture. Hands-on activities focus on writing code that implements concepts discussed in the lecture course, specifically creating databases and SQL queries. Prerequisite: CST-105.

Course Description

This course is intended primarily for mathematics, science, and engineering students. The goal of the course is to impart the concepts and techniques of modern linear algebra (over the real scalar field) with a significant level of rigor. Students write clearly about the concepts of linear algebra (definitions, counterexamples, simple proofs), and apply theory to examples. The course emphasizes the practical nature of solutions to linear algebra problems. Students implement some of these solutions, where appropriate, as computer programs. Prerequisite: MAT-264 or MAT-253

Course Description

This course introduces current trends in computer architecture with a focus on performance measurement, instruction sets, computer arithmetic, design and control of a data path, pipelining, memory hierarchies, input and output, and a brief introduction to multiprocessors. The laboratory reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. Hands-on activities focus on writing assembly language code that implements concepts discussed in the lecture course, focusing on registers, processes, threads, and I/O management. Prerequisites: (CST-210 and CST-215), or EEE-315.

Course Description

This course covers the role of statistics in engineering, probability, discrete random variables and probability distributions, continuous random variables and probability distributions, joint probability distributions, random sampling and data description, point estimation of parameters, statistical intervals for a single sample, and tests of hypotheses for a single sample. Prerequisite: MAT-253 or MAT-264.

Course Description

This writing-intensive course teaches students to develop innovative solutions to real-world problems, developing and testing hypotheses as they learn to create a new product or service.

Course Description

This course covers applications of differential equations in modeling and simulation. Students use mathematical models for continuous and discrete simulation, and develop applications for complex systems across a variety of domains. Students learn how to represent a system by a model and then execute the model to generate and statistically analyze data. The laboratory reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture. Hands-on activities focus on writing code that implements differential equation based modeling algorithms and visual simulations. Prerequisite: CST-201, CST-215, MAT-264.

Course Description

This course explains the concepts, structure, and mechanisms of modern operating systems. The course covers computational resources, such as memory, processors, networks, security, and how the programming languages, architectures, and operating systems interact. The laboratory reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture. Hands-on activities focus on writing a shell that implements process management, file management, and I/O management. Prerequisite: CST-307 or SWE-350.

Course Description

This course introduces the syntax and semantics of programming languages, program construction and software design. Lab activities will focus on analyzing the characteristics of context-free languages and solving a variety of languages construction challenges. Prerequisite: CST-201, CST-307.

Course Description

In this course, students test hypotheses or develop new hypotheses, cycling through a series of tests to develop a scalable business model, culminating in the development of a pitch for potential investors. Prerequisite: ENT-436 or STG-110 or ESG-210.

Course Description

The first capstone course provides students the opportunity to work in teams to tackle real world applied research and design projects in their chosen area of interest. Students develop a project proposal, conduct a feasibility study, learn to protect intellectual property, develop teamwork skills, budgets, and a schedule for completing the project. Students conduct extensive research, integrate information from multiple sources, and work with a mentor through multiple cycles of feedback and revisions. Students use this course to further develop technical writing and business presentation skills. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: CST-307, CST-315 and department approval.

Course Description

This course builds upon knowledge already acquired in the areas of system architecture and operating systems and focuses on the core issues of information security. Students learn fundamental aspects, security mechanisms, operational issues, security policies, and attack types. Prerequisite: ITT-121 or CST-210 or CST-221.

Course Description

This course examines the growth of the venture capital market and provides students with an understanding of the advantages and risks associated with venture capital financing. Both start-up and growth needs are explored. The course focuses on the more practical aspects of structuring transactions that add value for the firm, owners, and financial backers. Prerequisite: ENT-446.

Course Description

This course reviews the concepts and tools used in the development of compilers. Students synthesize topics covered in previous courses: formal languages, data structures, and computer architecture. The course reinforces the principles of software engineering and development through a complete cycle of building a working compiler. The laboratory reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture. Hands-on activities focus on writing a compiler including a lexer, parser, semantic analyzer, code generator, and optimizer. Prerequisites: CST-301 and MAT-374.

Course Description

This course covers 2D and 3D concepts, algorithms, and implementation methods using shader-based programming. Main topics covered include coordinate systems, transformations, material simulation, and animation. The laboratory reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture. Hands-on activities focus on writing vertex shaders and fragment shaders to implement light equations for coloring effects, textures, materials, and animation. Prerequisites: CST-201, MAT-262, and MAT-345.

Course Description

The second capstone course provides students the opportunity to implement and present the applied research project designed, planned, and started in the first capstone course. The capstone project is a culmination of the learning experiences while a student in the Computer Science program. Students conduct extensive research, integrate information from multiple sources, and work with a mentor through multiple cycles of feedback and revision. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of STG-451 with a grade of C or better.

Course Description

This course is a direct continuation of ITT-305. It expands the coverage of information security topics to include security domains, forensics, information states, security services, threat analysis, and vulnerabilities. Prerequisite: ITT-305.

Course Description

This course surveys current advances in computer science. Topics vary by semester and include current and emerging practice in computer science. Lab activities will focus on hands-on projects with a variety of technologies, devices, and programming languages. Prerequisite: CST-315, CST-301.

Course Description

This course is a study of the challenges associated with managing projects within the context of the overarching management framework of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Emphasis is placed on balancing competing priorities related to human resources, time constraints, and physical resources/materials, as well as managing and controlling project scope.

Locations

GCU Campus Student


Join Grand Canyon University’s vibrant and growing campus community, with daytime classes designed for traditional students. Immerse yourself in a full undergraduate experience, complete with curriculum designed within the context of our Christian worldview.

* Please note that this list may contain programs and courses not presently offered, as availability may vary depending on class size, enrollment and other contributing factors. If you are interested in a program or course listed herein please first contact your University Counselor for the most current information regarding availability.

* Please refer to the Academic Catalog for more information. Programs or courses subject to change.

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