Program Details

Bachelor of Science in Engineering with an Emphasis in Robotics

Offered By: College of Science, Engineering, & Technology
Next Start Date:
Program Now Enrolling
ProgramLength:
Total Program Credits: 128
Campus: 15 weeks
Transfer Credits:
Up to 90 credits, only 84 can be lower division
Program Tuition Rate:

Overview

Discover the Path to a Meaningful Engineering Career

Robots have extended human reach into realms once considered unreachable. Using powerful and complex systems, humans can now conduct research and perform tasks almost anywhere, from nuclear reactors to the human heart and beyond.

Grand Canyon University's (GCU) Bachelor of Science in Engineering with an Emphasis in Robotics provides students with the broad foundational skills necessary for a variety of engineering careers, with the capability to understand the fast-evolving world of robotics.

Develop the all-important engineering mindset. Discover a variety of pathways for specialization at the master’s degree level. Earn your Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree and uncover the scientific foundations of robot technology.

Degree Outcomes

Engineering and Robotics

The Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree program delivers the foundational knowledge and skills required for success across a variety of disciplines. Work with teams to develop solutions to a diverse range of real-world business and industrial challenges, while honing your critical thinking and innovation ability. Experience a rigorous engineering curriculum with a robotic emphasis, including coursework in math, chemistry, physics and biology, with a culminating Capstone project experience.

What You Will Learn

Gain Skills to Design and Support Robotic Systems

Beyond the rigorous training in engineering, you will study the following key aspects of Robotics:

  • Dynamics system modeling and analysis
  • Feedback control
  • Sensors and signal conditioning
  • Actuators and power electronics
  • Computer interfacing with peripherals
  • Computer programming

Career Outcomes

Expanding Opportunities in Robotic Engineering

The Bachelor of Science in Engineering with an Emphasis in Robotics will prepare you for a successful interdisciplinary career. Bring your understanding of computer-aided engineering to a variety of environments, especially those relevant to the design, building and operation of automated systems. This unique degree in engineering can translate into career opportunities in nuclear engineering, manufacturing, industrial engineering and biotechnology.

Course List

The programs offered at Grand Canyon University may vary by content and course length. You are currently viewing the program version available in Arizona. In order to view the specific course content and credit length available for your state, please contact a counselor at 1-855-GCU-LOPE or click here to request more information.
General Education Requirements:
34-40 credits
Major:
88 credits
Open Elective Credits:
0-6 credits
Total Degree Requirements:
128 credits

General Education Requirements

General Education coursework prepares Grand Canyon University graduates to think critically, communicate clearly, live responsibly in a diverse world, and thoughtfully integrate their faith and ethical convictions into all dimensions of life. These competencies, essential to an effective and satisfying life, are outlined in the General Education Learner Outcomes. General Education courses embody the breadth of human understanding and creativity contained in the liberal arts and sciences tradition. Students take an array of foundational knowledge courses that promote expanded knowledge, insight, and the outcomes identified in the University's General Education Competencies. The knowledge and skills students acquire through these courses serve as a foundation for successful careers and lifelong journeys of growing understanding and wisdom.

Requirements

Upon completion of the Grand Canyon University's University Foundation experience, students will be able to demonstrate competency in the areas of academic skills and self-leadership. They will be able to articulate the range of resources available to assist them, explore career options related to their area of study, and have knowledge of Grand Canyon's community. Students will be able to demonstrate foundational academic success skills, explore GCU resources (CLA, Library, Career Center, ADA office, etc), articulate strategies of self-leadership and management and recognize opportunities to engage in the GCU community.

Course Options

  • UNV-112, Success in Science, Engineering and Technology & Lab: 4 credits
  • UNV-103, University Success: 4 credits
  • UNV-303, University Success: 4 credits
  • UNV-108, University Success in the College of Education: 4 credits

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to construct rhetorically effective communications appropriate to diverse audiences, purposes, and occasions (English composition, communication, critical reading, foreign language, sign language, etc.). Students are required to take 3 credits of English grammar or composition.

Course Options

  • UNV-104, 21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Literacy: 4 credits
  • ENG-105, English Composition I: 4 credits
  • ENG-106, English Composition II: 4 credits

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to express aspects of Christian heritage and worldview. Students are required to take CWV-101/CWV-301.

Course Options

  • CWV-101, Christian Worldview: 4 credits
  • CWV-301, Christian Worldview: 4 credits

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to use various analytic and problem-solving skills to examine, evaluate, and/or challenge ideas and arguments (mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, geology, astronomy, physical geography, ecology, economics, theology, logic, philosophy, technology, statistics, accounting, etc.). Students are required to take 3 credits of intermediate algebra or higher.

Course Options

  • MAT-154, Applications of College Algebra: 4 credits
  • MAT-144, College Mathematics: 4 credits
  • PHI-105, 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving: 4 credits
  • MAT-134, Applications of Algebra: 4 credits
  • BIO-220, Environmental Science: 4 credits

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to demonstrate awareness and appreciation of and empathy for differences in arts and culture, values, experiences, historical perspectives, and other aspects of life (psychology, sociology, government, Christian studies, Bible, geography, anthropology, economics, political science, child and family studies, law, ethics, crosscultural studies, history, art, music, dance, theater, applied arts, literature, health, etc.). If the predefined course is a part of the major, students need to take an additional course.

Course Options

  • HIS-144, U.S. History Themes: 4 credits
  • PSY-100, Psychology in Everyday Life: 4 credits
  • SOC-100, Everyday Sociology: 4 credits

Required General Education Courses

Course Description

This is the first course of a two-semester introduction to chemistry intended for undergraduates pursuing careers in the health professions and others desiring a firm foundation in chemistry. The course assumes no prior knowledge of chemistry and begins with basic concepts. Topics include an introduction to the scientific method, dimensional analysis, atomic structure, nomenclature, stoichiometry and chemical reactions, the gas laws, thermodynamics, chemical bonding, and properties of solutions. Prerequisite: MAT-134 or MAT-154. Co-Requisite: CHM-113L.

Course Description

The laboratory section of CHM-113 reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. Experiments include determination of density, classification of chemical reactions, the gas laws, determination of enthalpy change using calorimetry, and determination of empirical formula. Prerequisite: MAT-134 or MAT-154. Co-requisite: CHM-113.

Course Description

This course presents the fundamentals of algebra and trigonometry with an applied emphasis; it provides the background and introduction for the study of calculus. Topics include review of linear equations and inequalities in one and multiple variables; functions and their graphs; polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; vectors and complex numbers. Slope and rate of change are introduced to set up the concepts of limits and derivatives. There is an emphasis on both an understanding of the mathematical concepts involved as well as their application to the principles and real-world problems encountered in science and engineering. Software is utilized to facilitate problem analysis and graphing. Prerequisite: MAT-134 or MAT-154.

Course Description

This is the second course of a two-semester introduction to chemistry intended for undergraduates pursuing careers in the health professions and others desiring a firm foundation in chemistry. Upon successful completion of this course, students demonstrate knowledge and/or skill in solving problems involving the principles of chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, and thermodynamics; understanding chemical reactions using kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics; comparing and contrasting the principal theories of acids and bases; solving equilibrium involving acids, bases, and buffers; describing solubility equilibrium; describing terms associated with electrochemistry and solving problems associated with electrochemistry; and describing fundamentals and applications of nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHM-113. Co-requisite: CHM-115L.

Course Description

The laboratory section of CHM-115 reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. Experiments include determination of rate law, examples of Le Châtelier’s principle, the use of pH indicators, buffer preparation, experimental determination of thermodynamic quantities, the use of electrochemical cells, and qualitative and quantitative analysis. Prerequisites: CHM-113 and CHM-113L. Co-Requisite: CHM-115.

Course Description

This course will enhance student skills in working with others, communication, project management, self-discipline, and creativity. The TIE is an inquiry-based learning course and lab that integrates multiple academic disciplines to develop and demonstrate a student's critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Students will have the opportunity to examine and work on real world problems. The team project selected will be managed like a business and/or research project; objectives will be set and teams will develop strategies and action plans. Training modules will be conducted for understanding of hypothesis-based research, business and work processes, team effectiveness skills, team diversity, learning style differences, and effective oral and written communications. Co-requisite: STG-110L

Course Description

This lab course is designed to reinforce principles learned in STG-110. The laboratory reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture. Hands-on activities focus on teamwork and cross-disciplinary problem solving. Co-requisite: STG-110.

Course Description

This course provides an insight into professional communications and conduct associated with careers in science, engineering and technology. Students learn about the changing modes of communication in these disciplines recognizing the advances in digital communications. They gain practical experience in developing and supporting a thesis or position in written, oral and visual presentations. Students will explore concepts and issues in professional ethics and conduct such as privacy, discrimination, workplace etiquette, cyber-ethics, network and data security, identity theft, ownership rights and intellectual property. This is a writing intensive course.

Program Core Courses

Course Description

This course provides students with the basic concepts of programming. Students will solve engineering problems by designing and modularizing solutions with proper use of functions and objects. They will understand good techniques of programming style, as well as have the ability to design, code, debug, and document program solutions. Prerequisite: MAT-261.

Course Description

This course provides a rigorous treatment of the concepts and methods of elementary calculus and its application to real-world problems. Topics include differentiation, optimization, and integration.  Software is utilized to facilitate problem analysis and graphing.  Prerequisite: MAT-261.

Course Description

This course provides a rigorous treatment of the concepts and methods of integral, multivariable, and vector calculus and its application to real-world problems. Prerequisite: MAT-262.

Course Description

This course is a calculus-based study of basic concepts of physics, including motion; forces; energy; the properties of solids, liquids, and gases; and heat and thermodynamics. The mathematics used includes algebra, trigonometry, and vector analysis. A primary course goal is to build a functional knowledge that allows students to more fully understand the physical world and to apply that understanding to other areas of the natural and mathematical sciences. Conceptual, visual, graphical, and mathematical models of physical phenomena are stressed. Students build critical thinking skills by engaging in individual and group problem-solving sessions. Co-requisites: PHY-121L and MAT-264.

Course Description

This calculus-based course utilizes lab experimentation to practice concepts of physical principles introduced in the PHY-121 lecture course. Students are able to perform the proper analysis and calculations to arrive at the correct quantifiable result when confronted with equations involving gravity, sound, energy, and motion. Co-requisites: PHY-121 and MAT-264.

Course Description

This course introduces CAD features, including fundamentals of 3D modeling for design. Includes overview of modeling, graphical manipulation, part structuring, coordinate system, and developing a strategy of modeling. CAD software enables students to make the transition from 2D drafting to 3D modeling. Students use symbolic math software and 3D modeling tools to visualize and solve engineering problems. The course emphasizes industry practices for modeling parts, extracting drawings, and creating assemblies. Prerequisite: MAT-261.

Course Description

This calculus-based course is the second in a 1-year introductory physics sequence. In this course, the basics of three areas in physics are covered, including electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. The sequence of topics includes an introduction to electric and magnetic fields. This is followed by the nature of light as an electromagnetic wave and topics associated with geometric optics. The final topic discussed in the course is quantum mechanics. Prerequisites: PHY-121 and PHY-121L. Co-requisite: PHY-122L.

Course Description

This course utilizes lab experimentation to practice concepts of physical principles introduced in the PHY-122 lecture course. Some of the topics students understand and analyze involve the relationship between electric charges and insulators/conductors, magnetism in physics, energy transformations in electric circuits, the relationship between magnetism and electricity, and how they relate to the medical industry. Prerequisites: PHY-121 and PHY-121L. Co-requisite: PHY-122.

Course Description

This course focuses on solutions and qualitative study of linear systems of ordinary differential equations, and on the analysis of classical partial differential equations. Topics include first- and second-order equations; series solutions; Laplace transform solutions; higher order equations; Fourier series; second-order partial differential equations. Boundary value problems, electrostatics, and quantum mechanics provide the main context in this course. Prerequisite: MAT-253 or MAT-264.

Course Description

This course covers force and moment vectors, resultants, and principles of statics and free-body diagrams. The course presents students with applications to simple trusses, frames, and machines. Additional topics covered include properties of areas, second moments, internal forces in beams, laws of friction, principles of particle dynamics, mechanical systems and rigid-body dynamics, kinematics and dynamics of plane systems, and energy and momentum of 2-D bodies and systems. Prerequisites: PHY-121 and PHY-121L.

Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the study of basic probability, descriptive and inferential statistics, and decision making. Emphasis is placed on measures of central tendency and dispersion, correlation, regression, discrete and continuous probability distributions, quality control population parameter estimation, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT-134, MAT-144 or MAT-154.

Course Description

This course includes DC and AC electrical circuit analysis methods, and analog and digital circuit design and analysis, including operational amplifier linear circuits, and digital combinational logic circuits. Computer interface circuits which combine both digital and analog devices for interfacing physical systems will be introduced in the context of computer based hardware. Prerequisites: PHY-122 and PHY-122L. Co-requisite: ESG-202L.

Course Description

The laboratory section of ESG-202 supports and extends principles learned in the lecture course. Students will design and create circuits then test the input-output characteristics and compare to analysis. In addition, they will design circuits to interface with computer based electronic boards. Prerequisites: PHY-122, and PHY-122L. Co-Requisite: ESG-202.

Course Description

This course covers the principles of thermodynamics, including properties of ideal gases and water vapors, and the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Additional topics include closed systems and control volume, basic gas and vapor cycles, basic refrigeration, entropy, and an introduction to thermodynamics of reacting mixtures. Students will analyze simple to complex thermodynamic problems. Prerequisites: PHY-121 and PHY-121L.

Course Description

This course covers basic concepts in materials structure and its relation to properties. The course will provide students with a broad overview of materials science and engineering. The goal of this course is to understand the fundamental reasons that materials have the properties they do. Students examine properties of interesting materials and try to understand them in terms of their actual atomic or molecular structure. Prerequisite: CHM-115, CHM-115L, PHY-122, PHY-122L. Co-Requisite: MEE-340L.

Course Description

This is the lab section of MEE-340. The course reinforces theoretical concepts covered in lecture and with hands-on activities. Students conduct lab experiments to better understand how certain properties of materials manifest themselves. Prerequisite: CHM-115, CHM-115L, PHY-122, PHY-122L. Co-Requisite: MEE-340.

Course Description

This course is a study of fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. Topics include principles of momentum, energy, and mass transport, stress and strain rate descriptions, diffusion, calculation of transport coefficients, problems in viscous flow, dimensional analysis, and turbulence. Similarities and differences of the various phenomena are also examined. Prerequisites: PHY-122, PHY-122L, STG-330, and MAT-364.

Course Description

This course introduces standard mechanical tests and computer based data acquisition techniques, e.g., installing thermocouples, strain gages, positioning static and probes. ASME and ASTM test codes are studied, as are OSHA standards. The course examines how various physical property and system performance tests are set up, conducted, and analyzed. Prerequisites: ESG-202, ESG-202L, and MAT-364.

Course Description

This course is intended primarily for mathematics, science, and engineering students. The goal of the course is to impart the concepts and techniques of modern linear algebra (over the real scalar field) with a significant level of rigor. Students write clearly about the concepts of linear algebra (definitions, counterexamples, simple proofs), and apply theory to examples. The course emphasizes the practical nature of solutions to linear algebra problems. Students implement some of these solutions, where appropriate, as computer programs. Prerequisite: MAT-264 or MAT-253

Course Description

This course covers the basics of robotic design using concepts from computer, electrical, and mechanical engineering. Topics covered may include modeling of dynamic systems, utilizing sensors and actuators, interfacing computer hardware, and developing simple control algorithms. This course is a team and project based course where multiple robots will be designed and tested. Prerequisite: ESG-360.

Course Description

The first capstone course provides students the opportunity to work in teams to tackle real world applied research and design projects in their chosen area of interest. Students develop a project proposal, conduct a feasibility study, learn to protect intellectual property, develop teamwork skills, budgets, and a schedule for completing the project. Students conduct extensive research, integrate information from multiple sources, and work with a mentor through multiple cycles of feedback and revisions. Students use this course to further develop technical writing and business presentation skills. This is a writing intensive course.

Course Description

Machine elements are selected and designed based on theories and methods developed in statics, dynamics, and strength of materials. Individual components will also be analyzed using CAE methods.

Course Description

This course introduces students to the processes of mathematical modeling and analysis of dynamic systems with mechanical, thermal, electrical and fluid elements. Topics covered include: time domain solutions, analog computer simulation, linearization techniques, block diagram representation, numerical methods and frequency domain solutions. Hands-on lab activities enhance students’ ability to mathematically analyze components and systems for mechanical performance. Prerequisites: MAT-364, ESG-202, and ESG-202L.

Course Description

This course covers advanced topics in robotic design using concepts from computer, electrical, and mechanical engineering. Topics covered may include advanced modeling of dynamic systems; tactile, force, and proximity sensors; computer vision; and power electronics associated with various actuators. This course is a team and project based course where multiple robots will be designed and tested. Prerequisites: ESG-330, MAT-345, and STG-330.

Course Description

The second capstone course provides students the opportunity to implement and present the applied research project designed, planned, and started in the first capstone course. The capstone project is a culmination of the learning experiences while a student in the Computer Science program. Students conduct extensive research, integrate information from multiple sources, and work with a mentor through multiple cycles of feedback and revision. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ESG-451.

Course Description

This course covers the integration of machine elements into a system and the verification that the resulting system performs as intended in its operational environment. Areas of study include technical planning, requirements management, integration, verification, validation, and production. Prerequisite: MEE-471.

Course Description

This course synthesizes applications of linear algebra to modal analysis of dynamical systems, controllability-observability, pole-placement design, separation principle, design of model-based compensators, frequency domain multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) singular value analysis, linear quadratic regulator (LQR), Kalman filter, state estimation, and linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control system design. The course also presents an introduction to H-infinity/H-2 control system design, with applications to real-world control system design problems, robot dynamics, and robot control. The laboratory is designed to reinforce principles learned in the lecture and to apply these principles and theories to the design, assembly and control of a robot. All computational aspects of this project will be performed in Matlab. Prerequisites: PHY-122, and PHY-122L.

Course Description

This course surveys the main areas of biomedical engineering and illustrates the application of engineering principles for the design of biomedical innovations. Topics focus on the various products and processes related to the health science industries, diagnostic instruments, artificial organs, biomedical devices, bio-signaling, health monitoring and information integration. The laboratory is designed to reinforce principles learned and to apply these principles and theories to design systems and devices that integrate mechanical, electronic, and biological elements. Computational software will be used to support laboratory data analyses.

Faculty Bios

Program Locations

Campus

Campus

Join Grand Canyon University’s vibrant and growing campus community, with daytime classes designed for traditional students. Immerse yourself in a full undergraduate experience, complete with curriculum designed within the context of our Christian worldview. New modern classrooms, suite-style residence halls, popular dining options, resort-style swimming pools and a focus on creating a dynamic student life make GCU a top choice for high school graduates and transfer students. Exciting events, well-known guest speakers and Division I athletics round out the traditional student experience. Our welcoming campus community is the perfect place to find your purpose.

* The Department of Education defines how an institution must calculate a program's On-Time Completion rate for federal disclosure purposes. The On-Time Completion rate is based on a program’s published required number of months to complete all degree requirements as provided in the institution’s catalog. Completion statistics are updated every January and are based on the cohort of students who graduated between 7/1 – 6/30 of the preceding year. The On-Time Completion rate is determined by the number of students in the cohort who completed the program within the published program length divided by the number of students in the cohort who graduated.

On-campus program disclosures

* Please refer to the Academic Catalog for more information. Program subject to change.