Program Details

Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Offered By: College of Science, Engineering, & Technology
Next Start Date:
Program Now Enrolling
ProgramLength:
Total Program Credits: 120
Campus: 15 weeks
Transfer Credits:
Up to 90 credits, only 84 can be lower division
Program Tuition Rate:
Campus: $8250 per semester. [More Info]

Overview

Pursue Your Purpose in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Grand Canyon University's Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology offers you an interdisciplinary curriculum drawing from biology and chemistry, as well as advanced courses in biochemistry and genetics. Providing a background in physical and life sciences, the biochemistry degree program is ideal to pursue if you are planning for a career in a high-growth area such as biotechnology or health care research or advanced training in graduate biomedical professional programs. This program conforms to guidelines provided by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

The biology and molecular biology degree program concludes with a capstone project in the sciences. You discuss and write on current topics in your field or your own research experiences, and prepare an extensive written scientific report or proposal relevant to your program of study. The capstone project reflects synthesis and integration of course content and good scientific practice.

As part of this Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology program, you may also elect to take coursework in entrepreneurship, with a recommended elective that examines the importance of creating innovative work environments in organizations of all sizes to ensure long-term competitiveness. Explore innovation from the perspective of product development, internal process improvements and strategic shifts. You also have the opportunity to participate in an experiential innovation project.

Degree Outcomes

Gain Core Competencies

The curriculum encompasses material focusing on biology, microbiology, physics, chemistry, molecular and cellular biology, genetics, medical physiology, biochemistry, instrumental analysis and pharmacology. Courses are also combined with a lab to support further hands-on learning surrounding principles garnered from the lecture course.

For example, in the medical physiology lab, you develop a deeper understanding of the normal function of cells, tissues and organ systems through hands-on experimentation, as well as the use of simulation software.

Upon completing the biochemistry and molecular biology degree program, you will have knowledge of core competencies in the following:

  • Science foundation: Explain and apply scientific processes, biological concepts, properties of matter, chemical reactions and physical principles
  • Scientific communication: Effectively interact and report information verbally and in written form with peers, clients, agencies and the broader community
  • Professionalism and ethics: Understand the social and professional context of biochemistry and molecular biology while adhering to ethical codes of conduct
  • Data analysis and interpretation: Explain how data is collected, extracted and analyzed
  • Biochemistry and molecular biology: Explain organic compounds, describe biological molecules, examine genetic information, analyze heredity and explain biochemical principles
  • Biochemical and molecular analysis: Analyze genomic information, assess immunology, apply scientific principles for the analysis of biological molecules, assess scientific literature and demonstrate proper lab behavior during an experiment

What You Will Learn

Engage in Theoretical and Hands-On Learning

Course topics include:

  • Principles and applications of microbiology ad microorganisms
  • Comprehensive study of composition, structure, energetics, regulation and growth of eukaryotic cells
  • Study of electricity and magnetism, optics and modern physics
  • Examination of the principles of heredity and variation
  • Quantitative, qualitative and instrumental analysis of various sample types

Career Outcomes

Make a Difference in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Fields

Many graduates with a degree in biochemistry and molecular biology enter employment in the biomedical, biotechnology, pharmaceutical, agricultural research and chemical industries. Your skillset may also prepare you to work in university, government or hospital research laboratories.

Course List

The programs offered at Grand Canyon University may vary by content and course length. You are currently viewing the program version available in Arizona. In order to view the specific course content and credit length available for your state, please contact a counselor at 1-855-GCU-LOPE or click here to request more information.
General Education Requirements:
34-40 credits
Major:
76 credits
Open Elective Credits:
4-10 credits
Total Degree Requirements:
120 credits

General Education Requirements

General Education coursework prepares Grand Canyon University graduates to think critically, communicate clearly, live responsibly in a diverse world, and thoughtfully integrate their faith and ethical convictions into all dimensions of life. These competencies, essential to an effective and satisfying life, are outlined in the General Education Learner Outcomes. General Education courses embody the breadth of human understanding and creativity contained in the liberal arts and sciences tradition. Students take an array of foundational knowledge courses that promote expanded knowledge, insight, and the outcomes identified in the University's General Education Competencies. The knowledge and skills students acquire through these courses serve as a foundation for successful careers and lifelong journeys of growing understanding and wisdom.

Requirements

Upon completion of the Grand Canyon University's University Foundation experience, students will be able to demonstrate competency in the areas of academic skills and self-leadership. They will be able to articulate the range of resources available to assist them, explore career options related to their area of study, and have knowledge of Grand Canyon's community. Students will be able to demonstrate foundational academic success skills, explore GCU resources (CLA, Library, Career Center, ADA office, etc), articulate strategies of self-leadership and management and recognize opportunities to engage in the GCU community.

Course Options

  • UNV-112, Success in Science, Engineering and Technology & Lab: 4 credits
  • UNV-103, University Success: 4 credits
  • UNV-303, University Success: 4 credits
  • UNV-108, University Success in the College of Education: 4 credits

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to construct rhetorically effective communications appropriate to diverse audiences, purposes, and occasions (English composition, communication, critical reading, foreign language, sign language, etc.). Students are required to take 3 credits of English grammar or composition.

Course Options

  • UNV-104, 21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Literacy: 4 credits
  • ENG-105, English Composition I: 4 credits
  • ENG-106, English Composition II: 4 credits

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to express aspects of Christian heritage and worldview. Students are required to take CWV-101/CWV-301.

Course Options

  • CWV-101, Christian Worldview: 4 credits
  • CWV-301, Christian Worldview: 4 credits

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to use various analytic and problem-solving skills to examine, evaluate, and/or challenge ideas and arguments (mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, geology, astronomy, physical geography, ecology, economics, theology, logic, philosophy, technology, statistics, accounting, etc.). Students are required to take 3 credits of intermediate algebra or higher.

Course Options

  • MAT-154, Applications of College Algebra: 4 credits
  • MAT-144, College Mathematics: 4 credits
  • PHI-105, 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving: 4 credits
  • MAT-134, Applications of Algebra: 4 credits
  • BIO-220, Environmental Science: 4 credits

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to demonstrate awareness and appreciation of and empathy for differences in arts and culture, values, experiences, historical perspectives, and other aspects of life (psychology, sociology, government, Christian studies, Bible, geography, anthropology, economics, political science, child and family studies, law, ethics, crosscultural studies, history, art, music, dance, theater, applied arts, literature, health, etc.). If the predefined course is a part of the major, students need to take an additional course.

Course Options

  • HIS-144, U.S. History Themes: 4 credits
  • PSY-100, Psychology in Everyday Life: 4 credits
  • SOC-100, Everyday Sociology: 4 credits

Program Core Courses

Course Description

This course is a study of biological concepts emphasizing the interplay of structure and function, particularly at the molecular and cellular levels of organization. Cell components and their duties are investigated, as well as the locations of cellular functions within the cell. The importance of the membrane is studied, particularly its roles in controlling movement of ions and molecules and in energy production. The effect of genetic information on the cell is followed through the pathway from DNA to RNA to protein. Co-requisite: BIO-181L.

Course Description

This lab course is designed to reinforce principles learned in BIO-181 through experiments and activities which complement and enhance understanding of macromolecules, cell membrane properties, cellular components, and their contribution to cell structure and function. Assignments are designed to relate cellular processes such as metabolism, cell division, and the flow of genetic information to cell structure. Co-requisite: BIO-181.

Course Description

This course presents the fundamentals of algebra and trigonometry with an applied emphasis; it provides the background and introduction for the study of calculus. Topics include review of linear equations and inequalities in one and multiple variables; functions and their graphs; polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; vectors and complex numbers. Slope and rate of change are introduced to set up the concepts of limits and derivatives. There is an emphasis on both an understanding of the mathematical concepts involved as well as their application to the principles and real-world problems encountered in science and engineering. Software is utilized to facilitate problem analysis and graphing. Prerequisite: MAT-134 or MAT-154.

Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the study of basic probability, descriptive and inferential statistics, and decision making. Emphasis is placed on measures of central tendency and dispersion, correlation, regression, discrete and continuous probability distributions, quality control population parameter estimation, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT-134, MAT-144 or MAT-154.

Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the principles and applications of microbiology and a study of the general characteristics of microorganisms, their activities, and their relationship to humans. Students develop understanding of microbial cell structure and function, microbial genetics, related pathologies, immunity, and other selected applied areas. Co-requisite: BIO-205L.

Course Description

The laboratory section of BIO-205 supports further learning surrounding principles gained in the lecture course. Students develop fundamental skills in microbiological laboratory techniques, microscopy methodologies, and the isolation and identification of pathogenic microorganisms. Co-requisite: BIO-205.

Course Description

This course is a study of basic concepts of physics, including motion; forces; energy; the properties of solids, liquids, and gases; and heat and thermodynamics. The mathematics used includes algebra, trigonometry, and vector analysis. A primary course goal is to build a functional knowledge that allows students to more fully understand the physical world and to apply that understanding to other areas of the natural and mathematical sciences. Conceptual, visual, graphical, and mathematical models of physical phenomena are stressed. Students build critical thinking skills by engaging in individual and group problem-solving sessions. Prerequisite: MAT-250, MAT-261 or College Algebra. Co-Requisite: PHY-111L.

Course Description

This course utilizes lab experimentation to practice concepts of physical principles introduced in the PHY-111 lecture course. Learners are able to perform the proper analysis and calculations to arrive at the correct quantifiable result when confronted with equations involving gravity, sound, energy, and motion. Prerequisite: MAT-250, MAT-261 or College Algebra. Co-requisite: PHY-111.

Course Description

This is the first course of a two-semester introduction to chemistry intended for undergraduates pursuing careers in the health professions and others desiring a firm foundation in chemistry. The course assumes no prior knowledge of chemistry and begins with basic concepts. Topics include an introduction to the scientific method, dimensional analysis, atomic structure, nomenclature, stoichiometry and chemical reactions, the gas laws, thermodynamics, chemical bonding, and properties of solutions. Prerequisite: MAT-134 or MAT-154. Co-Requisite: CHM-113L.

Course Description

The laboratory section of CHM-113 reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. Experiments include determination of density, classification of chemical reactions, the gas laws, determination of enthalpy change using calorimetry, and determination of empirical formula. Prerequisite: MAT-134 or MAT-154. Co-requisite: CHM-113.

Course Description

This course is a comprehensive study of the composition, structure, energetics, regulation, and growth of eukaryotic cells. Other topics include the essential processes of cells including the correlation of structure and function at the organelle and cellular levels. As well as, principles of molecular biology including recombinant DNA technology and other approaches and method used to investigate cell structure, development, chromosome organization, gene expression, and gene regulation. Prerequisites: BIO-181 and BIO-181L.

Course Description

This course is the second in a one-year introductory physics sequence. In this course, the basics of three areas in physics are covered, including electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Course topics include an introduction to electric and magnetic fields, the nature of light as an electromagnetic wave, geometric optics, quantum mechanics, and nuclear reactions. Prerequisites: PHY-111 and PHY-111L. Co-Requisite: PHY-112L.

Course Description

This course utilizes lab experimentation to practice concepts of physical principles introduced in the PHY-112 lecture course. Some of the topics learners understand and analyze involve the relationship between electric charges and insulators/conductors, magnetism in physics, energy transformations in electric circuits, the relationship between magnetism and electricity, and how they relate to the medical industry. Prerequisites: PHY-111 and PHY-111L. Co-Requisite: PHY-112.

Course Description

This is the second course of a two-semester introduction to chemistry intended for undergraduates pursuing careers in the health professions and others desiring a firm foundation in chemistry. Upon successful completion of this course, students demonstrate knowledge and/or skill in solving problems involving the principles of chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, and thermodynamics; understanding chemical reactions using kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics; comparing and contrasting the principal theories of acids and bases; solving equilibrium involving acids, bases, and buffers; describing solubility equilibrium; describing terms associated with electrochemistry and solving problems associated with electrochemistry; and describing fundamentals and applications of nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHM-113. Co-requisite: CHM-115L.

Course Description

The laboratory section of CHM-115 reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. Experiments include determination of rate law, examples of Le Châtelier’s principle, the use of pH indicators, buffer preparation, experimental determination of thermodynamic quantities, the use of electrochemical cells, and qualitative and quantitative analysis. Prerequisites: CHM-113 and CHM-113L. Co-Requisite: CHM-115.

Course Description

This writing intensive course provides a comprehensive examination of the principles of heredity and variation, including Mendelian, molecular, and population genetics. Students explore topics such as gene mapping, DNA structure and replication, population genetics, and molecular change. Prerequisites: BIO-181 and BIO-181L.

Course Description

This course is the first of two organic chemistry courses. The first half of this course develops the vocabulary and concepts of chemical bonding, chemical structure, acid-base principles, and nomenclature needed to understand properties and reactions of organic compounds. The second half of this course discusses chemical reactions, including radical reactions, substitution and elimination reactions, and synthesis and reactions of alkenes. Students learn how to predict reaction products and draw reaction mechanisms. Organic synthesis and structural determination are also covered. Instruction includes lecture and in-class problem solving. Prerequisites: CHM-115 and CHM-115L. Co-requisite: CHM-231L.

Course Description

The laboratory section of CHM-231 reinforces principles learned in the lecture course through various techniques that organic chemists use to synthesize compounds. Students use these techniques throughout the semester. These techniques include determination of melting point, determination of solubility, thin layer chromatography, recrystallization, and distillation. Structural determination using theories discussed in CHM-231 is applied to unknown compounds. Prerequisites: CHM-115 and CHM-115L. Co-requisite: CHM-231.

Course Description

This course focuses on the normal function of human cells, tissues, and organ systems. Emphasis is placed on the interconnections and biochemical functions between systems of the body and maintenance of homeostasis. Minor emphasis is placed on the dysfunctions and resulting pathologies. Prerequisites: One of the following combinations: 1) BIO-182; or 2) BIO-181 and BIO-181L. Co-requisite: BIO-360L.

Course Description

This course involves the exploration of normal function of human cells, tissues, and organ systems through hands-on laboratory experimentation. Students develop a deeper understanding of the materials learned in BIO-360 using simulation software for human functions, systems, and pathologies. Prerequisites: One of the following combinations: 1) BIO-182; or 2) BIO-181 and BIO-181L. Co-requisite: BIO-360.

Course Description

The course objective is to survey basic biochemical principles, including the composition, structure, and function of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Important biochemical principles include structure-function correlation, chemical reactivity, kinetics and equilibrium, thermodynamics, membrane structure and function, and metabolic energy pathways. The application of biochemical concepts in the medical field is emphasized. Prerequisites: BIO-181 and BIO-181L, and one of the following combinations: 1) CHM-331 and CHM-331L or 2) CHM-231 and CHM-231L. Co-requisite: CHM-360L.

Course Description

This laboratory course covers modern biochemical laboratory techniques and their theoretical foundations. Topics include methods for protein, nucleic acid, and lipid isolation and characterization; enzyme assays; chromatography; electrophoresis; and representing and manipulating proteins and nucleic acids. Experiments are designed for hands-on experimentation and students acquire practical techniques currently used in biochemistry laboratories. Prerequisites: BIO-181 and BIO-181L, and one of the following combinations: 1) CHM-331 and CHM-331L or 2) CHM-231 and CHM-231L. Co-requisite: CHM-360.

Course Description

This course is the second of two organic chemistry courses. The course is organized by common organic functional groups, including alkynes, alcohols, ether, aromatic compounds, ketones and aldehydes, amines, carboxylic acid, and carboxylic acid derivatives. The reactions and properties of each functional group are discussed. Students learn how to predict reaction products, draw reaction mechanisms, and predict physical properties. Instruction includes lecture and in-class problem solving. The final assignment for the course is a paper that describes the synthesis of a popular pharmaceutical agent. Prerequisites: CHM-231 and CHM-231L. Co-requisite: CHM-232L.

Course Description

The laboratory section of CHM-232 supports and extends principles learned in the lecture course. Students carry out various organic syntheses using techniques taught in CHM-231. The experiments include preparation of an alkene from an alcohol, a Grignard reaction, preparation of cinnamaldehyde, nitration of methyl benzoate, synthesis of N-Methyl Prozac, an Aldol reaction, Benzimidizole synthesis, and a Diazonium coupling reaction. Prerequisites: CHM-231 and CHM-231L. Co-requisite: CHM-232.

Course Description

This course introduces students to the quantitative, qualitative, and instrumental analysis of various sample types. Methods for selecting proper techniques to answer various questions are discussed. Analytical methods for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of sample by gas chromatography, mass spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, capillary and gel electrophoresis, and ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy are also covered. Other techniques, such as high-pressure liquid chromatography and thin layer chromatography, are discussed as well. Prerequisites: CHM-360 and CHM-360L and one of the following combinations: 1) CHM-231 and CHM-231L, or 2) CHM-331 and CHM-331L., or 3) CHM-235 and CHM-235L. Co-requisite: CHM-365L.

Course Description

The laboratory section of CHM-365 reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. This course allows students to apply quantitative, qualitative, and instrumental analysis of various sample types. Focus is on the validity of results. Analytical methods for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of sample by gas chromatography, mass spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, capillary and gel are also covered. Prerequisites: CHM-360 and CHM-360L and one of the following combinations: 1) CHM-231 and CHM-231L, or 2) CHM-331 and CHM-331L, or 3) CHM-235 and CHM-235L. Co-requisite: CHM-365.

Course Description

This course presents advanced topics in biochemistry, including mechanisms of metabolic and environmental information transfer, cellular signal transduction mechanisms, metabolic pathway interrelationships and regulation, carbohydrate, lipid and nitrogen metabolism, and the cell cycle and regulation. Prerequisites: BIO-205, BIO-205L, CHM-360, and CHM-360L. Co-requisite: CHM-460L.

Course Description

This hands-on laboratory course is designed to provide a project-based experience utilizing modern biochemical techniques. This course will reinforce proper experimental design and control and will provide students with experience with several biochemical techniques, including DNA, RNA, and protein extraction from tissue and its analysis. This course will reinforce troubleshooting, confounds to analysis, and application of various techniques to reach a target goal. Co-requisite: CHM-460.

Course Description

This course presents advanced topics in genetics and genomics, including prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA replication and repair, regulation of transcription in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, reverse transcription, mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, cancer and personalized medicine, epigenetics, genomic analyses, genomic libraries and databases, phylogenetics and bioinformatics. Prerequisite: BIO-457, BIO-205; Co-Requisite: BIO-475L.

Course Description

This hands-on laboratory course is designed to provide a project-based experience utilizing DNA, RNA, and molecular analysis techniques. These include isolation of DNA, action and laboratory use of restriction and modification enzymes, DNA amplification, DNA sequencing, mutagenesis and cloning, gene inactivation and complementation analysis, RT-PCR, DNA and RNA gel electrophoresis, Southern and Northern blot, and expression analyses (including Western blot and DNA microarrays). Co-requisite: BIO-475.

Course Description

This course presents the foundational concepts of pharmacology emphasizing basic mechanisms of drug action. Pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics principles and theories are presented. The course details the development of the current understanding of receptor signal transduction in mammalian systems. The course introduces the molecular biochemistry of receptor structure; mass action considerations governing ligand-receptor binding interactions; molecular pharmacology associated with signal transduction; and specific considerations of receptors as pharmaceutical targets. Following this introduction, a systematic study of the effects of drugs on representative organ systems and disease processes, the mechanisms by which drugs produce their therapeutic and toxic effects, and the factors influencing their absorption, distribution, and biological actions. Prerequisites: CHM-360 and CHM-360L and one of the following combinations: 1) CHM-231 and CHM-231L, or 2) CHM-331 and CHM-331L.

Course Description

The capstone project is a culmination of the learning experiences while a student in the science programs at Grand Canyon University. Students discuss and write on current topics in their field and prepare an extensive written scientific report or proposal on select topics on the sciences, relevant to their program of study. The capstone project needs to reflect synthesis and integration of course content and good scientific practice. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: Senior status.

Faculty Bios

Program Locations

Campus

Campus

Join Grand Canyon University’s vibrant and growing campus community, with daytime classes designed for traditional students. Immerse yourself in a full undergraduate experience, complete with curriculum designed within the context of our Christian worldview. New modern classrooms, suite-style residence halls, popular dining options, resort-style swimming pools and a focus on creating a dynamic student life make GCU a top choice for high school graduates and transfer students. Exciting events, well-known guest speakers and Division I athletics round out the traditional student experience. Our welcoming campus community is the perfect place to find your purpose.

* The Department of Education defines how an institution must calculate a program's On-Time Completion rate for federal disclosure purposes. The On-Time Completion rate is based on a program’s published required number of months to complete all degree requirements as provided in the institution’s catalog. Completion statistics are updated every January and are based on the cohort of students who graduated between 7/1 – 6/30 of the preceding year. The On-Time Completion rate is determined by the number of students in the cohort who completed the program within the published program length divided by the number of students in the cohort who graduated.

On-campus program disclosures

* Please refer to the Academic Catalog for more information. Program subject to change.