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Program Details

Bachelor of Science in Finance

Offered By: Colangelo College of Business

Overview: BS in Finance

A Bachelor of Science (BS) in Finance degree from GCU prepares graduates to work in the financial world. Finance degree majors learn to analyze data and information related to money and finances. They know how to evaluate investments and determine beneficial alternatives. GCU graduates who major in finance are able to integrate their understanding of financial markets on a global scale with decision-making for everyone from individual clients to major corporations.

Why Major in Finance?

Students interested in money management should consider a Bachelor of Science in Finance. There are vast career possibilities at the end of the degree program that include working in just about any industry or sector and with any size client-base. Finance majors can work for families, nonprofits and mega corporations.

A finance degree ensures that people who enjoy working with money are prepared to handle areas like:

  • Interest
  • Stocks
  • Bonds
  • Securities
  • Portfolios
  • Trade relationships
  • Global finances

Bachelor of Science in Finance vs. Accounting

Finance and accounting are interrelated fields. A BS in Finance uses the accounting records and financial reports created by accountants to make decisions. The data provided in the reports helps finance majors analyze possibilities and create plans for money management. In turn, accounting majors collect the data from these decisions and plans.

To better understand the difference, here is what finance majors study:

  • Economics
  • Banking and financial markets
  • Trade
  • Investments
  • Portfolio management
  • Securities and risks

While accounting students learn about:

  • Accounting procedures
  • Financial statement preparation
  • Auditing
  • Tax preparation

Finance Bachelor’s Degree Curriculum at GCU

Like all degrees earned from The Colangelo College of Business at Grand Canyon University, the BS in Finance is based on core business domains. These domains ensure that finance students are well-rounded, ethical practitioners. Finance students learn how to develop useful communication and critical thinking skills, information literacy and research skills, business and operations understanding as well as legal and ethical practices.

The finance degree program core classes focus on:

  • Investment strategies
  • Modern monetary systems
  • Capital markets
  • Budget and accounting report analysis
  • Financial proposals
  • Credit reporting and money lending
  • Risks and mitigation strategies
  • Real estate proposals and financing options

After completing an in-person or online finance degree at GCU, graduates can begin preparation to earn their Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA), Certified Financial Planner (CPF) or state/federal licensing exams.

Careers with a Finance BS Degree

GCU BS in Finance graduates have the opportunities to work in many different capacities. Places looking for finance degree holders include corporations, financial and banking institutions, brokerage firms, investment businesses and insurance organizations. Local, state and federal governments may be another option for employment.

Positions within these environments can vary greatly for finance graduates. Depending on personal interest, you might find work as a:

  • Financial analyst
  • Banker
  • Advisor
  • Loan or credit officer
  • Operations analyst
  • Relationships manager
  • Customer support associate
  • Sales agent
  • Financial planner
  • Broker

People who work in finance can make a big difference in the lives of individuals and the success of businesses. If managing money is a job description you are interested in, a degree in finance may be right for you. Learn more about the Bachelor of Science in Finance degree at GCU.

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TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS & COURSE LENGTH:
Total Program Credits: 120
Campus: 15 weeks
TRANSFER CREDITS:
Up to 90 credits, only 84 can be lower division
PROGRAM TUITION RATE:
Campus: $8,250 per semester [More Info]

Course List

The programs offered at Grand Canyon University may vary by content and course length. You are currently viewing the program version available in Arizona. For information about specific course content, credit length and VA approval in your state, please contact a counselor at 1-855-GCU-LOPE or click here to request more information.
General Education Requirements:
34-40 credits
Major:
76 credits
Open Elective Credits:
4-10 credits
Total Degree Requirements:
120 credits

General Education Requirements

General Education coursework prepares Grand Canyon University graduates to think critically, communicate clearly, live responsibly in a diverse world, and thoughtfully integrate their faith and ethical convictions into all dimensions of life. These competencies, essential to an effective and satisfying life, are outlined in the General Education Learner Outcomes. General Education courses embody the breadth of human understanding and creativity contained in the liberal arts and sciences tradition. Students take an array of foundational knowledge courses that promote expanded knowledge, insight, and the outcomes identified in the University's General Education Competencies. The knowledge and skills students acquire through these courses serve as a foundation for successful careers and lifelong journeys of growing understanding and wisdom.

Program Core Courses

Course Description

This course provides the foundation of core knowledge within the field of information technology. Topics include technology-centric organizations, the type and role of fundamental information technology systems, data management to include privacy and security, e-business and m-business, hardware, software, and computer networks.

Course Description

This course is an introduction to the accounting cycle and the construction of financial statements. Students explore the fundamental principles and practices of financial accounting as outlined by Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP); the steps in the accounting cycle from journalizing transactions through the preparation of financial statements; and the use and interpretation of the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. Prerequisite: MAT-134, MAT-144 or MAT-154.

Course Description

This course is an introduction to the use of managerial accounting data in the decision-making process. Topics include the use of cost-volume-profit (CVP) analysis and relevant costs in decision making, using budgets and the balanced scorecard to evaluate performance, methods for setting prices of products and services, and analyzing capital investment opportunities. Prerequisite: ACC-250.

Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the practical application of descriptive and inferential statistics in business. Topics include probability, probability distributions, the central limit theorem, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression. Prerequisite: MAT-134, MAT-144 or MAT-154.

Course Description

This course develops the concepts of calculus through a wide variety of applications. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives, antiderivatives, and integration. Prerequisite: MAT-154.

Course Description

This course focuses on the fundamental ideas of microeconomics. Students examine the market forces of supply and demand under different market structures in order to understand how economic agents make decisions about both consumption and production. The structure, conduct, and performance of markets are evaluated through analysis of consumer, producer, and societal welfare. Students explore the topic of factor markets in which the incomes of most workers and owners of capital and property are determined. Prerequisites: ACC-240 or ACC-250 and BUS-352.

Course Description

This writing intensive course is a comprehensive study of the legal and ethical issues of concern to business, including those areas of the U.S. legal system that are most relevant to business, such as the law of torts, strict liability, intellectual property, and contract law. It explores the role of ethics and values in business decision making, and approaches these subjects from the perspective of the stakeholders as opposed to an economic interpretation of the firm and its responsibilities.

Course Description

This course focuses on the national economy by examining macroeconomic data measuring national income, the cost of living, production and growth, and unemployment. Students examine the basic functions of the monetary system and analyze the macro economy in terms of long-run economic productivity and growth and in terms short-run fluctuations. The influence and effect of macroeconomic policy is studied within the context of current events. Prerequisite: ECN-361.

Course Description

This course introduces models and practices used by contemporary marketers in fast-paced, dynamic domestic and global markets including the marketing concept and processes for developing, implementing, and assessing the effectiveness of marketing plans. Building from a foundational understanding of consumer behavior and marketing research, students examine the development and implementation of marketing mix strategies and tactics with emphasis on integrated marketing communications that effectively combine traditional advertising and promotion with digital marketing.

Course Description

This course is an introduction to managerial finance and the financial markets, analysis of financial statements, time value of money, interest rates, asset valuation, assessment of risk, cost of capital, and capital budgeting. Prerequisites: ECN-220, ECN-351, or ECN-361; and ACC-240 or ACC-250.

Course Description

This course is an advanced study of the finance function within the modern corporation. Topics covered include financial analysis and planning, the valuation of financial assets, capital budgeting, capital structure, and working capital management. Prerequisites: ACC 240 or ACC 260 or ACC 350; and FIN 350.

Course Description

This course studies stocks, bonds, mutual funds, exchange-traded funds, and other investment vehicles, and their application in investing. The securities market and trading procedures are discussed. The course introduces portfolio theory that is applicable to both professional portfolio management and individual investment decisions. The application of portfolio theory to corporate investments and diversification is also introduced. Prerequisite: FIN-350.

Course Description

Drawing upon real-world management situations, this course is a study of individual and group behavior in organizations through detailed coverage of the functions of management, individual differences/diversity, leadership, motivation, decision making, organizational design, and organizational change and development. Emphasis is placed on how an understanding of organizational behavior leads to effective management practice.

Course Description

This introductory course explores fundamental concepts in risk management and insurance. Students learn to identify and mitigate commercial and personal risks through the use of financial products, including insurance and other financial instruments. Prerequisites: MAT-251 and FIN-350.

Course Description

In this introduction to the real estate industry, students learn about the risks and rewards associated with investing in and financing both residential and commercial real estate. This course includes concepts and techniques relevant to a variety of careers related to real estate. This course also provides students with a better understanding of real estate for their own personal investment and financing decisions. Prerequisites: MAT-251 and FIN-350.

Course Description

This course is an advanced study of investments and their application in investment portfolio management. The course develops and emphasizes portfolio theory that is applicable to both professional portfolio management and individual investment decisions. The application of portfolio theory to corporate investments and diversification is also discussed. Prerequisite: FIN-450.

Course Description

This course provides a study of interrelationships between the international monetary environment and financial planning for corporations with overseas operations. The topics covered include the international monetary system, the foreign exchange market, managing exchange exposure, political risk management, import/export financing, and international performance evaluation. Prerequisite: FIN-350.

Course Description

This course is an overview of the modern monetary system as the informal infrastructure for a dynamic and decentralized global economy. Students examine this system by looking at a variety of markets where deal-making activities take place between central banks, traditional banks, and "near banks" that act as deal-makers in both capital and money markets by supplying liquidity to the system. Innovative central bank policies and activities intended to stabilize the system are discussed. Prerequisites: ECN-362 and FIN-350.

Course Description

This writing-intensive course serves as the capstone experience in business and management that includes the gradual development of a comprehensive and integrative business plan. This course is designed to assist students in their development as managers, servant leaders, and successful strategic thinkers. Management, marketing, accounting, finance, economics, global perspectives, law, and political issues are covered during this course. Prerequisites: MGT-420; FIN-210 or FIN-350; and MKT-245 or MKT-315.

Program Locations

Campus

Join Grand Canyon University’s vibrant and growing campus community, with daytime classes designed for traditional students. Immerse yourself in a full undergraduate experience, complete with curriculum designed within the context of our Christian worldview. New modern classrooms, suite-style residence halls, popular dining options, resort-style swimming pools and a focus on creating a dynamic student life make GCU a top choice for high school graduates and transfer students. Exciting events, well-known guest speakers and Division I athletics round out the traditional student experience. Our welcoming campus community is the perfect place to find your purpose.

* Please note that this list may contain programs that are not presently offered as program availability may vary depending on class size, enrollment and other contributing factors. If you are interested in a program listed herein please first contact your University Counselor for the most current information regarding availability of the program.


Program Domains

* The Department of Education defines how an institution must calculate a program's On-Time Completion rate for federal disclosure purposes. The On-Time Completion rate is based on a program's published required number of months to complete all degree requirements as provided in the institution's catalog. Completion statistics are updated every January and are based on the cohort of students who started the program in the same year and then graduated within the published program length .

On-campus program disclosures (48 months)

* Please refer to the Academic Catalog for more information. Program subject to change.