Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering Technology

Offered By: College of Science, Engineering, & Technology

Earn Your BS in Electrical Engineering Technology

If you’re interested in a career in the manufacturing and engineering services sector, consider exploring the possibilities in electrical engineering technology. The Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering Technology degree program at Grand Canyon University was developed to give students a thorough grounding in immediately applicable industry knowledge. This degree emphasizes hands-on training over traditional math and science courses. This provides an ideal alternative for students who desire practical knowledge and skills.

The BS in Electrical Engineering Technology is offered by GCU’s College of Science, Engineering and Technology. It examines the components and functioning of complex electrical systems, with an emphasis on building and maintaining those systems. The thoughtfully designed curriculum introduces students to crucial skills and knowledge areas required for the industry. These include computer architecture, communication networks and applied circuits. Students work closely with experienced faculty members to design, plan and execute engaging projects with real-world implications.

What Is an Electrical Engineering Technology Bachelor of Science Degree?

Electrical engineering technology is an applied engineering field that encompasses product design, product development, manufacturing, maintenance, testing and quality control. GCU’s Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering technology degree gives students a solid framework of knowledge in this field. Graduates are capable of demonstrating their mastery of circuits, computer design, electronic materials and automation.

Guided by their peers and instructors, students at GCU become confident communicators who are prepared to conduct themselves in a professional manner in the workplace. Our Christian campus delivers curriculum through the lens of the Christian worldview. Students are prepared to thoughtfully and morally handle ethical issues and dilemmas in the workplace.

Gain Hands-On Knowledge in Technical Foundations

This on-campus BS in Electrical Engineering Technology degree is a rigorous survey that includes courses such as the following:

  • Digital Electronics and Integrated Circuits and Lab
  • Introduction to Computer Architecture Lecture and Lab
  • Platforms and Network Technologies
  • Electrical Troubleshooting and Maintenance and Lab
  • Power and Energy Technologies and Lab

For this degree program, students must meet the minimum score requirement on the Placement Exam. Alternatively, students can fulfill the course prerequisites to place into MAT-154, Applications of College Algebra.

In individual assignments and team projects, students learn the foundations of computer programming, electric circuits and the electrical systems that power and control modern robotics. They develop a mastery of communications technologies, including the inner workings of networks, local network configuration and scalability planning with routers and switches. Other key topic areas include:

  • Preventive maintenance and fault isolation, including common failure modes and ways of improving system reliability
  • Methods of controlling electrical maintenance systems
  • The necessary elements of quality production
  • Methods of energy generation and delivery

Explore a Future in Engineering Technology with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering Technology

Electrical engineering technology graduates may collaborate with engineers on the design and development of electrical components, assemblies or systems. They may also work on product evaluation testing. Graduates from this program may one day contribute to innovative solutions for businesses and industries. Some of the technologies that these professionals may work on include:

  • Medical monitoring equipment
  • Communications equipment
  • Navigational equipment
  • Computers and other electronics

Electrical engineering technology graduates may work for private corporations, research facilities, government agencies or government contractors.

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TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS & COURSE LENGTH:
Total Program Credits: 128
Campus: 15 weeks
TRANSFER CREDITS:
Up to 90 credits, only 84 can be lower division
PROGRAM TUITION RATE:
Campus: $8,250 per semester [More Info]

Course List

The programs offered at Grand Canyon University may vary by content and course length. You are currently viewing the program version available in Arizona. For information about specific course content, credit length and VA approval in your state, please contact a counselor at 1-855-GCU-LOPE or click here to request more information.
General Education Requirements:
34-40 credits
Major:
88 credits
Open Elective Credits:
0-6 credits
Total Degree Requirements:
128 credits

General Education Requirements

General Education coursework prepares Grand Canyon University graduates to think critically, communicate clearly, live responsibly in a diverse world, and thoughtfully integrate their faith and ethical convictions into all dimensions of life. These competencies, essential to an effective and satisfying life, are outlined in the General Education Learner Outcomes. General Education courses embody the breadth of human understanding and creativity contained in the liberal arts and sciences tradition. Students take an array of foundational knowledge courses that promote expanded knowledge, insight, and the outcomes identified in the University's General Education Competencies. The knowledge and skills students acquire through these courses serve as a foundation for successful careers and lifelong journeys of growing understanding and wisdom.

Required General Education Courses

Course Description

This is the first course of a two-semester introduction to chemistry intended for undergraduates pursuing careers in the health professions and others desiring a firm foundation in chemistry. The course assumes no prior knowledge of chemistry and begins with basic concepts. Topics include an introduction to the scientific method, dimensional analysis, atomic structure, nomenclature, stoichiometry and chemical reactions, the gas laws, thermodynamics, chemical bonding, and properties of solutions. Co-Requisite: CHM-113L.

Course Description

The laboratory section of CHM-113 reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. Experiments include determination of density, classification of chemical reactions, the gas laws, determination of enthalpy change using calorimetry, and determination of empirical formula. Co-Requisite: CHM-113.

Course Description

This course will enhance student skills in working with others, communication, project management, self-discipline, and creativity. The TIE is an inquiry-based learning course and lab that integrates multiple academic disciplines to develop and demonstrate a student's critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Students will have the opportunity to examine and work on real world problems. The team project selected will be managed like a business and/or research project; objectives will be set and teams will develop strategies and action plans. Training modules will be conducted for understanding of hypothesis-based research, business and work processes, team effectiveness skills, team diversity, learning style differences, and effective oral and written communications. Co-requisite: STG-110L

Course Description

This lab course is designed to reinforce principles learned in STG-110. The laboratory reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture. Hands-on activities focus on teamwork and cross-disciplinary problem solving. Co-requisite: STG-110.

Course Description

This course presents the fundamentals of algebra and trigonometry with an applied emphasis; it provides the background and introduction for the study of calculus. Topics include review of linear equations and inequalities in one and multiple variables; functions and their graphs; polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; vectors and complex numbers. Slope and rate of change are introduced to set up the concepts of limits and derivatives. There is an emphasis on both an understanding of the mathematical concepts involved as well as their application to the principles and real-world problems encountered in science and engineering. Software is utilized to facilitate problem analysis and graphing. Prerequisite: MAT-134 or MAT-154.

Course Description

This course provides an insight into professional communications and conduct associated with careers in science, engineering and technology. Students learn about the changing modes of communication in these disciplines recognizing the advances in digital communications. They gain practical experience in developing and supporting a thesis or position in written, oral and visual presentations. Students will explore concepts and issues in professional ethics and conduct such as privacy, discrimination, workplace etiquette, cyber-ethics, network and data security, identity theft, ownership rights and intellectual property. This is a writing intensive course.

Program Core Courses

Course Description

This course is a study of basic concepts of physics, including motion; forces; energy; the properties of solids, liquids, and gases; and heat and thermodynamics. The mathematics used includes algebra, trigonometry, and vector analysis. A primary course goal is to build a functional knowledge that allows students to more fully understand the physical world and to apply that understanding to other areas of the natural and mathematical sciences. Conceptual, visual, graphical, and mathematical models of physical phenomena are stressed. Students build critical thinking skills by engaging in individual and group problem-solving sessions. Prerequisite: MAT-154, MAT-250, MAT-261 or College Algebra. Co-Requisite: PHY-111L.

Course Description

This course utilizes lab experimentation to practice concepts of physical principles introduced in the PHY-111 lecture course. Learners are able to perform the proper analysis and calculations to arrive at the correct quantifiable result when confronted with equations involving gravity, sound, energy, and motion. Prerequisite: MAT-154, MAT-250, MAT-261 or College Algebra. Co-Requisite: PHY-111.

Course Description

This course provides a foundation for programming and problem solving using computer programming, as well as an introduction to the academic discipline of IT. Topics include variables, expressions, functions, control structures, and pervasive IT themes: IT history, organizational issues, and relationship of IT to other computing disciplines. The course prepares students for advanced concepts and techniques in programming and information technology, including object-oriented design, data structures, computer systems, and networks. The laboratory reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture. Hands-on activities focus on writing code that implements concepts discussed in lecture and on gaining initial exposure to common operating systems, enterprise architectures, and tools commonly used by IT professionals. Prerequisite: MAT-154 or MAT-261.

Course Description

This course provides a rigorous treatment of the concepts and methods of elementary calculus and its application to real-world problems. Topics include a brief review of linear, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse functions; understanding and calculating limits, continuity, and derivatives as rates of change; differentiation rules including derivatives of polynomials, exponentials, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions; product and quotient rules, the chain rule, and implicit differentiation; related rates, curve sketching, maximum and minimum problems, mean value theorem, linear approximation, indeterminate forms, and L’Hospital’s rule; and applied optimization problems, antiderivatives, and approximating areas under the curve. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT-250 or MAT-261.

Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the study of basic probability, descriptive and inferential statistics, and decision making. Emphasis is placed on measures of central tendency and dispersion, correlation, regression, discrete and continuous probability distributions, quality control population parameter estimation, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT-134, MAT-144 or MAT-154.

Course Description

This course is the second in a one-year introductory physics sequence. In this course, the basics of three areas in physics are covered, including electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Course topics include an introduction to electric and magnetic fields, the nature of light as an electromagnetic wave, geometric optics, quantum mechanics, and nuclear reactions. Prerequisites: PHY-111 and PHY-111L. Co-Requisite: PHY-112L.

Course Description

This course utilizes lab experimentation to practice concepts of physical principles introduced in the PHY-112 lecture course. Some of the topics learners understand and analyze involve the relationship between electric charges and insulators/conductors, magnetism in physics, energy transformations in electric circuits, the relationship between magnetism and electricity, and how they relate to the medical industry. Prerequisites: PHY-111 and PHY-111L. Co-Requisite: PHY-112.

Course Description

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of electric circuits. Students will learn methods for analyzing DC networks under different loading conditions. Topics include Kirchoff’s voltage and current laws, node analysis, mesh analysis, impedance, series and parallel load combinations, transient analysis, operational amplifiers (op-amps), and Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (SPICE) modeling. Students also develop skills in PCB fabrication and soldering. Prerequisites: PHY-111 and PHY-111L. Co-Requisite: EET-202L.

Course Description

This laboratory-based course reinforces the analysis of DC networks by providing additional hands on experience in breadboarding, modeling, and measuring inputs and outputs for a given circuit. Prerequisites: PHY-111 and PHY-111L. Co-Requisite: EET-202.

Course Description

This in an introductory course in discrete mathematics with extensive coverage of digital logic. Topics covered include logic, Boolean algebra, circuits, number theory, sequences, recursion, sets, functions, counting, finite state machines, automata, and regular expressions. An emphasis will be placed on writing computer programs that address key concepts discussed in lecture. Prerequisite: CST-110 or CST-111 or CST-105.

Course Description

This course builds on the topics of EET-202 and introduces more advanced circuit analysis concepts. Topics include complex impedance, AC steady-state response, resonance, passive and active filters, Bode plots, and magnetic circuits. Students practice circuit design and verification in MATLAB. Prerequisite: EET-202.

Course Description

This course covers topics in electrical and mechanical instrumentation and data acquisition. Topics include gauges and transducers, calibration, signal noise and conditioning, computerized data acquisition (DAQ) systems, results documentation, and statistical analysis of data. Prerequisite: PHY-111, PHY-111L & PHY-112, PHY-112L.

Course Description

This course provides an in-depth coverage of object-oriented programming using most current application programming methods, languages, and tools. Students will design, create, run, and debug applications. The course emphasizes the development of correct, well-documented programs using object-oriented programming concepts. Students also learn to create GUI-based programs. Prerequisite: CST-110 or CST-111 or CST-105 or CST-117.

Course Description

This course exposes students to the fundamentals of networks and networking in IT. It then builds deeper understanding of how networks work, including the topics of LANs, WANs, service providers, packets, hubs, routers, switches, and Internet protocols. The laboratory reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture. Hands-on activities focus on setting up and configuring local and enterprise networks, experimenting with various topologies, and scalability planning with routers and switches. Prerequisite: CST-111 or CST-105.

Course Description

This course covers topics in electrical and mechanical instrumentation and data acquisition. Topics include gauges and transducers, calibration, signal noise and conditioning, computerized data acquisition (DAQ) systems, results documentation, and statistical analysis of data. Prerequisite: PHY-111, PHY-111L, PHY-112, PHY-112L, EET-202.

Course Description

This course teaches students about digital electronics and semiconductor-based devices. Topics include diodes, bipolar and field-effect transistors, logic gates, combinational and sequential logic, amplifier circuits, and microcontrollers. Prerequisite: EET-302.

Course Description

This course teaches fundamental concepts of materials science as they apply to electric, magnetic, thermal, and optical properties. Students will study topics such as crystal structure, carrier transport, and solid-state physics. Laboratory exercises may focus on microscopy techniques and electro-plating. Prerequisites: PHY-112, PHY-112L, CHM-113, and CHM-113L.

Course Description

The first senior project course provides students the opportunity to work in teams to tackle real world applied research and design projects in their chosen area of interest. Students develop a project proposal, conduct a feasibility study, learn to protect intellectual property, develop teamwork skills, budgets, and a schedule for completing the project. Students conduct extensive research, integrate information from multiple sources, and work with a mentor through multiple cycles of feedback and revisions. Students use this course to further develop technical writing and business presentation skills. This is a writing intensive course.

Course Description

This course examines methods of energy generation and delivery. Topics covered include motors and generators, power electronics, three-phase circuits, and power grid networks. Students will also contrast methods of power generation and storage as they consider their viability under different circumstances. Prerequisite: EET-302. Co-Requisite: ETG-415L.

Course Description

This laboratory-based course reinforces the exploration of power and energy technologies by providing additional hands on experience with motors and generators, power electronics, three-phase circuits, and power grid networks. Prerequisite: EET-302. Co-requisite: ETG-415.

Course Description

This course will emphasize the necessary elements leading to quality production. Course topics will include Statistical Process Control (SPC) and Six-Sigma. Prerequisite: MAT-274.

Course Description

This course covers topics in communications and networking. Students will study methods for analyzing continuous and discrete signals, sampling, noise, and data transmission protocols. Lab activities may include wireless networking, modulating radio signals, and system modeling in MATLAB. Prerequisite: EET-302.

Course Description

In this course students acquire the ability to install, configure, operate, and troubleshoot medium sized routed and switched networks. Students gain the knowledge and skills to make connections to remote sites via a WAN, and mitigate basic security threats. Prerequisite: ITT-115 or ITT-116.

Course Description

The second senior project course provides students the opportunity to implement and present the applied research project designed, planned, and started in the first senior project course. The senior project is a culmination of the learning experiences while a student in the Engineering Technology programs. Students conduct extensive research, integrate information from multiple sources, and work with a mentor through multiple cycles of feedback and revision. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ETG-498 with a grade of C or better.

Course Description

This course introduces students to topics in industrial automation such as the electrical systems that power and control modern robotics, the programming logic that directs their behavior, design and implementation challenges, automated metrology, safety protocols, and environmental considerations. Systems of focus may include electrical power generation, automotive manufacturing, and circuit board manufacturing and assembly, and silicon wafer handling. Prerequisite: ETG-415. Co-Requisite: ETG-410.

Course Description

This course introduces current trends in computer architecture with a focus on performance measurement, instruction sets, computer arithmetic, design and control of a data path, pipelining, memory hierarchies, input and output, and a brief introduction to multiprocessors. The laboratory reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. Hands-on activities focus on writing assembly language code that implements concepts discussed in the lecture course, focusing on registers, processes, threads, and I/O management. Prerequisites: MAT-252 or MAT-262, and CST-110 or CST-111 or CST-105.

Course Description

This course examines the various methods of controlling electrical mechanical systems using lumped parameter models. Topics include interfacing with analog and digital sensors, motors, and actuators. Advanced control software will be used for programming the systems. Prerequisites: EET-202 and ETG-222, or EET-325

Course Description

This course teaches preventative maintenance and fault isolation. Students learn about common failure modes and ways to increase system reliability. Topics include safety, test equipment, troubleshooting methodology, interpreting schematics, power distribution, common control circuits, and motor maintenance. Prerequisite: EET-320.

Program Locations

Campus

Join Grand Canyon University’s vibrant and growing campus community, with daytime classes designed for traditional students. Immerse yourself in a full undergraduate experience, complete with curriculum designed within the context of our Christian worldview. New modern classrooms, suite-style residence halls, popular dining options, resort-style swimming pools and a focus on creating a dynamic student life make GCU a top choice for high school graduates and transfer students. Exciting events, well-known guest speakers and Division I athletics round out the traditional student experience. Our welcoming campus community is the perfect place to find your purpose.

* Please note that this list may contain programs that are not presently offered as program availability may vary depending on class size, enrollment and other contributing factors. If you are interested in a program listed herein please first contact your University Counselor for the most current information regarding availability of the program.


Program Domains

* The Department of Education defines how an institution must calculate a program's On-Time Completion rate for federal disclosure purposes. The On-Time Completion rate is based on a program's published required number of months to complete all degree requirements as provided in the institution's catalog. Completion statistics are updated every January and are based on the cohort of students who started the program in the same year and then graduated within the published program length.

On-campus program disclosures (48 months)

* Please refer to the Academic Catalog for more information. Program subject to change.