Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science Degree: Pre-Athletic Training Emphasis

Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science with an Emphasis in Pre-Athletic Training

Offered By: College of Natural Sciences

Learn Foundational Knowledge in Kinesiology and Pre-Athletic Training

The Bachelor of Science (BS) in Exercise Science with a Pre-Athletic Training emphasis at Grand Canyon University (GCU) can help you enter the field of kinesiology. Offered by the College of Science, Engineering and Technology at GCU, this program is designed to teach you the foundational knowledge and skills to later translate to your career and may put you on the right path toward pursuing a master’s in athletic training degree.

This program lays a solid groundwork in exercise science, equipping you with essential principles, while immersing you in critical athletic training practices and subject matters. Through this on-campus program, you will study coursework and attend labs that cover various topics, including the following, to gain a well-rounded, STEM-focused education:

  • General nutrition and wellness
  • Resistance training and cardiovascular fitness
  • Health promotion
  • Kinesiology
  • Sport and exercise science
  • Treatment, care and prevention of athletic injuries
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Benefits of the BS in Exercise Science: Pre-Athletic Training Emphasis

In this degree program you’ll get a hands-on look at athletic training through a combination of theory-based courses and specified labs. You will experience a deep exploration of the relationship among kinesiology, exercise science and athletic training.

While completing your coursework, you will focus on competencies that can help you understand the breadth of the profession, including:

  • Explaining, analyzing and describing functions of the human body and how adaptations of movement relate to overall health and wellness
  • Analyzing, interpreting and applying data to improve movement and enhance exercises
  • Performing appropriate, preventative techniques
  • Considering psychological, biological and social factors and how they influence a person’s perception on healthcare practices

Grasping these competencies involves studying advanced healthcare topics, applying existing studies to practical scenarios and deeply comprehending human anatomy and how movement affects overall health.

Focus in Pre-Athletic Training to Graduate With a STEM Degree

The STEM programs at GCU integrate theoretical coursework with practical, interactive lab components, providing a comprehensive learning experience that enhances your grasp of the discipline.

Within this STEM degree, many of your courses will focus on science-related topics. The various sciences are directly applicable to pre-athletic training, including:

  • Biological sciences
  • Exercise science
  • Social sciences
  • Healthcare issues

GCU’s bachelor’s in exercise science with a pre-athletic training emphasis can prepare you to pursue graduate-level education, such as a master’s degree in athletic training. This program aims to provide you with a strong foundation and essential competencies, fostering your potential to pursue further educational opportunities.

Pre-Athletic Training Emphasis Course Topics

The BS in Exercise Science with an Emphasis in Pre-Athletic Training curriculum focuses on science, math and nutrition topics, while diving deeper into specific athletic training-related coursework and labs. Domains that you will cover in this program include the following:

  • Scientific foundations
  • Scientific communications
  • Professionalism and ethics
  • Data analysis and interpretation
  • Pre-athletic training concepts

Career Paths With a Pre-Athletic Training Focus

This degree with a pre-athletic training focus can provide a solid preparation to pursue career pathways, such as an exercise physiologist. You may also explore a wide range of professional opportunities and find yourself employed in various settings, including but not limited to:

  • High schools
  • Colleges and universities
  • Hospitals
  • Corporate wellness
  • Rehabilitation clinics
  • Fitness facilities

Earn Your Degree in Exercise Science From an Accredited University

GCU is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC), an organization that provides a comprehensive review of education institutions. Pre-athletic training students can feel confident knowing that their curriculum meets the highest standards established by the HLC. Proper accreditation of a university speaks to the quality of the programs offered. To learn more about accreditation, visit our Accreditation page.

Bachelor’s in Exercise Science: Pre-Athletic Training Emphasis FAQs

Exercise science is a degree background that is concerned with how different stressors affect the body and the optimization of a person’s overall health and wellness. It emphasizes the understanding of human anatomy, proper exercise techniques, kinesiology and motor learning. A pre-athletic training emphasis takes those concepts and channels them toward athletic training.

It is not. A pre-med degree is a course of study specifically designed to fulfill the prerequisites for medical school. Pre-med programs typically include coursework in biology, chemistry, physics and other science-related subjects at a master’s degree level to prepare students for medical school admission. The various options can have different academic focuses and career paths. For example, pursuing a master’s degree with pre-athletic training may lead to a career in athletic training and pre-med may lead to a path toward medical school and subsequent medical practice after earning a master’s degree.

Some may choose to pursue additional graduate-level programs after completing this BS exercise program, such as a master’s in athletic training or a graduate degree in other aspects of sports medicine.

Becoming an athletic trainer typically requires the completion of a master’s degree in exercise science, athletic training or a related field. This exercise science degree is a good starting point to work toward achieving your goal of becoming an athletic trainer. It requires a total of 120 credits for completion. Most of the classes are 15 weeks in length. Fill out the form on this page to speak to a university counselor to better understand how long it takes to earn your BS in Exercise Science degree.

Sports medicine and athletic training are related fields, but they are not the same. Sports medicine is a broad field that focuses on the medical and musculoskeletal aspects of physical activity, exercise and sports participation. It encompasses various disciplines such as orthopedics, cardiology, physiatry and primary care sports medicine. Athletic training, on the other hand, is a specific area within sports medicine that focuses on the prevention, evaluation, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries in athletes and physically active individuals.

Sports medicine professionals typically diagnose and treat injuries and medical conditions related to physical activity, while athletic trainers usually provide immediate care for acute injuries, implement injury prevention strategies, and assist in the rehabilitation process.

Take the next step toward pre-athletic training opportunities by earning your bachelor of science in exercise science. Work toward making a positive impact on the lives of athletes and individuals engaged in physical activity by filling out the form at the top of the page.

TOTAL CREDITS & COURSE LENGTH:
Total Credits: 120
Campus: 15 weeks
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TRANSFER CREDITS:
Up to 90 credits, only 84 can be lower division
TUITION RATE:
Campus: $8,250 per semester [More Info]

Course List

General Education Requirements:
34-40 credits
Major:
80 credits
Open Elective Credits:
0-6 credits
Degree Requirements:
120 credits

General Education Requirements

General Education coursework prepares Grand Canyon University graduates to think critically, communicate clearly, live responsibly in a diverse world, and thoughtfully integrate their faith and ethical convictions into all dimensions of life. These competencies, essential to an effective and satisfying life, are outlined in the General Education Learner Outcomes. General Education courses embody the breadth of human understanding and creativity contained in the liberal arts and sciences tradition. Students take an array of foundational knowledge courses that promote expanded knowledge, insight, and the outcomes identified in the University's General Education Competencies. The knowledge and skills students acquire through these courses serve as a foundation for successful careers and lifelong journeys of growing understanding and wisdom.

Requirements

Upon completion of the Grand Canyon University's University Foundation experience, students will be able to demonstrate competency in the areas of academic skills and self-leadership. They will be able to articulate the range of resources available to assist them, explore career options related to their area of study, and have knowledge of Grand Canyon's community. Students will be able to demonstrate foundational academic success skills, explore GCU resources (CLA, Library, Career Center, ADA office, etc), articulate strategies of self-leadership and management and recognize opportunities to engage in the GCU community.

Course Options

  • UNV-112, Success in Science, Engineering and Technology & Lab: 4
  • UNV-103, University Success: 4
  • UNV-303, University Success: 4
  • UNV-108, University Success in the College of Education: 4

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to construct rhetorically effective communications appropriate to diverse audiences, purposes, and occasions (English composition, communication, critical reading, foreign language, sign language, etc.). Students are required to take 3 credits of English grammar or composition.

Course Options

  • UNV-104, 21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Literacy: 4
  • ENG-105, English Composition I: 4
  • ENG-106, English Composition II: 4

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to express aspects of Christian heritage and worldview. Students are required to take CWV-101/CWV-301.

Course Options

  • CWV-101, Christian Worldview: 4
  • CWV-301, Christian Worldview: 4

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to use various analytic and problem-solving skills to examine, evaluate, and/or challenge ideas and arguments (mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, geology, astronomy, physical geography, ecology, economics, theology, logic, philosophy, technology, statistics, accounting, etc.). Students are required to take 3 credits of intermediate algebra or higher.

Course Options

  • MAT-154, Applications of College Algebra: 4
  • MAT-144, College Mathematics: 4
  • PHI-105, 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving: 4
  • BIO-220, Environmental Science: 4

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to demonstrate awareness and appreciation of and empathy for differences in arts and culture, values, experiences, historical perspectives, and other aspects of life (psychology, sociology, government, Christian studies, Bible, geography, anthropology, economics, political science, child and family studies, law, ethics, cross-cultural studies, history, art, music, dance, theater, applied arts, literature, health, etc.). If the predefined course is a part of the major, students need to take an additional course.

Course Options

  • HIS-144, U.S. History Themes: 4
  • PSY-102, General Psychology: 4
  • SOC-100, Everyday Sociology: 4

Core Courses

Course Description

This course is a study of biological concepts emphasizing the interplay of structure and function, particularly at the molecular and cellular levels of organization. Cell components and their duties are investigated, as well as the locations of cellular functions within the cell. The importance of the membrane is studied, particularly its roles in controlling movement of ions and molecules and in energy production. The effect of genetic information on the cell is followed through the pathway from DNA to RNA to protein. Co-requisite: BIO-181L.

Course Description

This lab course is designed to reinforce principles learned in BIO-181 through experiments and activities which complement and enhance understanding of macromolecules, cell membrane properties, cellular components, and their contribution to cell structure and function. Assignments are designed to relate cellular processes such as metabolism, cell division, and the flow of genetic information to cell structure. Co-requisite: BIO-181.

Course Description

This course provides the knowledge necessary to enter the field of sports performance. The topics of movement preparation, plyometrics, acceleration, absolute speed, and multidirectional speed are introduced. Students are also introduced to testing, movement skills, nutrition, mindset, motivation science, exercise techniques, and regeneration, as well as program planning for energy system development designed to improve strength, power, sprint, and speed. The course includes a focus on the science of coaching and training tactical populations such as fire, police, and military. Co-Requisite: EXS-210L.

Course Description

This course provides the skills necessary to enter the field of sports performance, with a focus on field and laboratory experiences designed to reinforce the practical application of the skills introduced in lecture. Co-Requisite: EXS-210.

Course Description

This is the first course of a two-semester introduction to chemistry intended for undergraduates pursuing careers in the health professions and others desiring a firm foundation in chemistry. The course assumes no prior knowledge of chemistry and begins with basic concepts. Topics include an introduction to the scientific method, dimensional analysis, atomic structure, nomenclature, stoichiometry and chemical reactions, the gas laws, thermodynamics, chemical bonding, and properties of solutions. Co-Requisite: CHM-113L.

Course Description

The laboratory section of CHM-113 reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. Experiments include determination of density, classification of chemical reactions, the gas laws, determination of enthalpy change using calorimetry, and determination of empirical formula. Co-Requisite: CHM-113.

Course Description

This course examines human anatomy and physiology with an emphasis on function and homeostasis of the following areas: tissues, integument, skeletal system, muscular system, and the nervous system. Case studies are utilized to reinforce physiological processes. Prerequisites: BIO-181 and BIO-181L. Co-Requisite: BIO-210L.

Course Description

This course involves study of the gross anatomy and function of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. This experiential lab involves an advanced exploration of concepts utilizing human cadavers and other supplemental materials. Co-Requisite: BIO-210.

Course Description

This course introduces the principles and techniques of strength and cardiovascular training. Musculoskeletal, cardiac, and respiratory anatomy are discussed, as well as how these systems adapt and manage the stress of regular exercise. Effective exercise programming is also discussed and applied to various physical abilities to develop a well-rounded program. Knowledge gained in this course prepares students for professional certification in the field of Resistance Training and Cardiovascular Fitness. Prerequisites: EXS-210 and EXS-210L. Co-Requisite: EXS-250L.

Course Description

This field and laboratory experience course introduces exercises that target specific muscle groups and systems of the body to show students how to design an effective exercise program. Students are introduced to effective coaching strategies, including progression, regression, coaching cues, and proper evaluation; these skills can then be applied to the professional development and delivery of an exercise session. Prerequisites: EXS-210 and EXS-210L. Co-Requisite: EXS-250.

Course Description

This course examines human anatomy and physiology with an emphasis on function and homeostasis of the following systems: endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive. Case studies are utilized to reinforce physiological processes. Prerequisites: BIO-210 and BIO-210L. Co-Requisite: BIO-211L.

Course Description

This course involves study of the gross anatomy and functions of the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, renal, and reproductive systems. This experiential lab involves an advanced exploration of concepts utilizing human cadavers and other supplemental materials. Prerequisite: BIO-210L. Co-Requisite: BIO-211.

Course Description

This course is a study of basic concepts of physics, including motion; forces; energy; the properties of solids, liquids, and gases; and heat and thermodynamics. The mathematics used includes algebra, trigonometry, and vector analysis. A primary course goal is to build a functional knowledge that allows students to more fully understand the physical world and to apply that understanding to other areas of the natural and mathematical sciences. Conceptual, visual, graphical, and mathematical models of physical phenomena are stressed. Students build critical thinking skills by engaging in individual and group problem-solving sessions. Prerequisite: MAT-154, MAT-250, MAT-261 or College Algebra. Co-Requisite: PHY-111L.

Course Description

This course utilizes lab experimentation to practice concepts of physical principles introduced in the PHY-111 lecture course. Learners are able to perform the proper analysis and calculations to arrive at the correct quantifiable result when confronted with equations involving gravity, sound, energy, and motion. Prerequisite: MAT-154, MAT-250, MAT-261 or College Algebra. Co-Requisite: PHY-111.

Course Description

This course provides students with a basic knowledge and understanding of the principles of sports medicine, the care and treatment of athletic trauma, and the use of proper conditioning principles for the prevention of injury. Prerequisites: BIO-155 and BIO-155L or BIO-201 and BIO-201L, or BIO-210 and BIO-210L. Co-Requisite: ATP-214L.

Course Description

This lab complements and supports the principles taught in the lecture course and provides students with a basic knowledge and understanding of the principles of sports medicine, the care and treatment of athletic trauma, safety and its importance in related settings, and the use of proper conditioning principles in the prevention of injury. Prerequisites: BIO-155 and BIO-155L or BIO-201 and BIO-201L, or BIO-210 and BIO-210L. Co-Requisite: ATP-214.

Course Description

This is a course in developmental psychology with emphasis on the physical, social, cognitive, personality, and moral developments within an individual. The course is designed to provide an understanding of the transitions of life from conception to death.

Course Description

This writing intensive course is a study of the effects of exercise on the body. Topics include nutrition as the basis for physical activity; how energy is produced and utilized during physical activity; the energy delivery and vital functions of the respiratory, cardiovascular, muscular, and nervous systems during exercise; how these systems can be enhanced through training; the impact of ergogenic aids and environmental stress on performance; and the effect of exercise on body composition, weight control, aging, and disease prevention. The body’s responses and adaptations to exercise at the systemic, as well as the subcellular level, are also discussed. Prerequisites: BIO-155 and BIO-155L, or BIO-201 and BIO-201L, or BIO-210 and BIO-210L. Co-Requisite: EXS-340L.

Course Description

This is a course of field and laboratory experiences designed to reinforce the basic principles learned in the lecture course. Skills of measurement and evaluation, including computerized methods employed to facilitate testing, are applied to physiological and systemic principles of exercise. Prerequisites: BIO-155 and BIO-155L, or BIO-201 and BIO-201L, or BIO-210 and BIO-210L. Co-Requisite: EXS-340.

Course Description

This capstone course acts as a culmination of the learning experiences during the exercise science program. A focus will be on career preparation including resume building, portfolio creation, and networking. Prerequisite: EXS-250 or EXS-318 or EXS-430 or EXS-485.

Course Description

This course provides an overview of factors influencing participation in individual or group sport and performance. Additionally, outcomes associated with performance are examined. Current theory and research are presented to develop an understanding of behaviors in sport and performance settings. Further, techniques applied to enhance sport performance are examined.

Course Description

This course provides a foundation of basic nutrition theory, with a focus on assessment, food components, exercise, nutrition, weight control, community programs, and resources. Application of these aspects is used to promote health and prevent illness.

Course Description

This course is an analysis of human movement, integrating knowledge of the skeletal, muscular, and neurological systems with the effects that gravity, friction, internal and external forces, and the laws of motion have on their functions. Topics presented include biomechanics of human bone, joint, and skeletal muscle; structure and function of the upper extremity, lower extremity, and spine; concepts of linear and angular kinematics and kinetics as applied to human motion; equilibrium and stability on land; and motion through a fluid medium of air or water. Included is the application of these factors to various types of physical skills. Prerequisites: BIO-155 and BIO-155L, or BIO-201 and BIO-201L, or BIO-210 and BIO-210L. Co-Requisite: EXS-335L.

Course Description

This laboratory course is designed to apply the anatomical, kinesiological, and biomechanical principles learned in the lecture course to human body movement. Movement of all of the major joints of the body is analyzed by relative and absolute joint position and muscle action, and biomechanical terms such as linear and angular kinematics, friction, work, power, energy, and torque are applied to human motion. Prerequisites: BIO-155 and BIO-155L, or BIO-201 and BIO-201L, or BIO-210 and BIO-210L. Co-Requisite: EXS-335.

Course Description

This writing intensive course is designed to provide the foundation of healthy behavior change in relation to influential factors. Content includes motivation for physical activity and healthy choices, as well as an introduction to the psychology of sports.

Course Description

This course provides the knowledge necessary to teach motor skills throughout the lifespan and apply current principles and theories of motor control and motor learning to exercise and rehabilitation populations. Content includes foundational neuroscience and connections with the musculoskeletal system, developmental motor milestones, motor control and motor learning principles, practice and feedback variables, teaching skill acquisition, and achieving maximum performance and retention. Prerequisite: BIO-202 or BIO-211.

Course Description

This course expands the principles and techniques of strength training including sport- and activity-specific program design and implementation. Knowledge gained in this course will contribute to student preparation for professional certification in the field. Prerequisites: EXS-250, EXS-250L, EXS-340 and EXS-340L. Co-Requisite: EXS-455L.

Course Description

This course applies the principles and techniques of strength training including sport- and activity-specific program design and implementation. Prerequisites: EXS-250, EXS-250L, EXS-340 and EXS-340L. Co-Requisite: EXS-455.

Course Description

This course includes the study of the proper techniques in caring for a patient by recognizing catastrophic and emergent conditions and treating appropriately. Students learn establishing and maintaining an airway, maintaining neutral spine alignment with an athlete wearing protective equipment, wound management, immobilization, transfer techniques including spine boarding, core body temperature, as well as caring for athletes with conditions such as asthma and diabetes. Students are prepared to complete Emergency Cardiac Care (ECC) certification upon completion of the course. Prerequisites: BIO-155 and BIO-155L, or BIO-202 and BIO-202L, or BIO-211 and BIO-211L.

Course Description

This course introduces analysis of special populations to assist in designing health education and physical fitness programs.

Course Description

This course provides students with basic instruction in research methods needed to read and critique published research in physical activity, health, nutrition, and sports performance. The course will also provide you with the skills needed to design studies and develop a research proposal. Statistical terminology and calculations will be introduced in the context of evaluating research. Students will be required to use statistical software throughout the course.

Locations

GCU Campus Student


Join Grand Canyon University’s vibrant and growing campus community, with daytime classes designed for traditional students. Immerse yourself in a full undergraduate experience, complete with curriculum designed within the context of our Christian worldview.

* Please note that this list may contain programs and courses not presently offered, as availability may vary depending on class size, enrollment and other contributing factors. If you are interested in a program or course listed herein please first contact your University Counselor for the most current information regarding availability.

* Please refer to the Academic Catalog for more information. Programs or courses subject to change.

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