Program Details

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (Pre-Licensure)

Offered By: College of Nursing and Health Care Professions
Next Start Date:
Program Now Enrolling
Approx. Course Length:
Campus: 15 weeks
Total Program Credits:
123 Credits
Transfer Credits:
Up to 90 credits, only 84 can be lower division

Overview

Make a Difference in Quality Healthcare as a BSN-Prepared Nurse

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing (Pre-Licensure) degree program within the College of Nursing and Health Care Professions prepares you to practice as a registered nurse generalist and member of a healthcare team in a variety of settings. You will learn to care for clients across the lifespan, although you may choose to work with a specific population or area upon graduation from nursing school.

The BSN program equips you with the skills and knowledge to provide evidence-based, holistic, safe, quality care for culturally and spiritually diverse individuals, families, communities and populations. Content areas include health promotion and disease prevention, care for special populations and preparation for leadership roles as an RN.

Acceptance into the nursing clinical program is competitive based on stacked rankings of composite scores which includes the required pre-requisite GPA and minimum HESI scores detailed in the University Policy Handbook.

As part of the nursing clinical program, you have an opportunity for hands-on experiences with clients and families across the continuum of care. You will also complete the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Evidence-Based Project Capstone course where you will apply nursing concepts and current literature into improving practice safety and quality, developing you into an effective change agent and advocate for well-informed health care.

High-achieving students will have the opportunity to apply for the Transition to Practice (TTP) Nurse Residency program prior to the last semester. If selected for this competitive clinical residency program, you will participate in a one-to-one student-preceptor relationship with a host agency. The TTP program is designed to augment practice readiness of the newly licensed registered nurse.

The baccalaureate degree in nursing, master's degree in nursing and Doctor of Nursing Practice are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). Select states may have additional requirements to meet their standards; reference your enrollment agreement or contact GCU for more information.

Degree Outcomes

Sharpen Your Patient Care Skills with a CCNE-Accredited Program

The BS in nursing degree program teaches you comprehensive patient care and prepares you as a nurse generalist to take the NCLEX-RN licensing exam. Our BSN coursework prepares you to think critically, communicate clearly and practice nursing ethically in a diverse world. You will learn to integrate Christian values to help you establish a foundation of caring and service to others.

What You Will Learn

Build Your Skills Through Practice

This nursing degree’s curriculum aligns with nursing best practices and the NCLEX-RN test plan.

Pre-licensure nursing course topics include:

  • Health assessment
  • Nursing pharmacology
  • Informatics
  • Research and evidence-based practice
  • Leadership, ethics and policy in healthcare
  • Population health

Specific areas of nursing theory pair with clinical experiences across the lifespan. These courses include:

  • Introduction to Nursing and Gerontology
  • Adult Health Nursing
  • Mental Health Across the Lifespan
  • Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family

In addition to developing skills to care for patients across the lifespan, you will also learn the professional RN’s role and responsibilities in accordance with nursing standards and guidelines. For a complete list and description of courses, including prerequisites, see the Course List below.

Career Outcomes

Prepare to Pass the NCLEX-RN

As a BS in nursing graduate, you will be eligible to take the NCLEX-RN. Obtaining an RN license allows you to work as a licensed registered nurse (RN) in the state of licensure. BSN education adds leadership, research and population health to enhance the care your patients receive and your ability to expand your career opportunities. This nursing degree program also prepares you to continue your education and earn a master’s degree in nursing.

Course List

The programs offered at Grand Canyon University may vary by content and course length. You are currently viewing the program version available in Arizona. In order to view the specific course content and credit length available for your state, please contact a counselor at 1-855-GCU-LOPE or click here to request more information.
General Education Requirements:
34-40 credits
Major:
83 credits
Open Elective Credits:
0-6 credits
Total Degree Requirements:
123 credits

General Education Requirements

General Education coursework prepares Grand Canyon University graduates to think critically, communicate clearly, live responsibly in a diverse world, and thoughtfully integrate their faith and ethical convictions into all dimensions of life. These competencies, essential to an effective and satisfying life, are outlined in the General Education Learner Outcomes. General Education courses embody the breadth of human understanding and creativity contained in the liberal arts and sciences tradition. Students take an array of foundational knowledge courses that promote expanded knowledge, insight, and the outcomes identified in the University's General Education Competencies. The knowledge and skills students acquire through these courses serve as a foundation for successful careers and lifelong journeys of growing understanding and wisdom.

Requirements

Upon completion of the Grand Canyon University's University Foundation experience, students will be able to demonstrate competency in the areas of academic skills and self-leadership. They will be able to articulate the range of resources available to assist them, explore career options related to their area of study, and have knowledge of Grand Canyon's community. Students will be able to demonstrate foundational academic success skills, explore GCU resources (CLA, Library, Career Center, ADA office, etc), articulate strategies of self-leadership and management and recognize opportunities to engage in the GCU community.

GCU Course Options

  • UNV-112, Success in Science, Engineering and Technology & Lab: 4 credits
  • UNV-103, University Success: 4 credits
  • UNV-303, University Success: 4 credits
  • UNV-108, University Success in the College of Education: 4 credits

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to construct rhetorically effective communications appropriate to diverse audiences, purposes, and occasions (English composition, communication, critical reading, foreign language, sign language, etc.). Students are required to take 3 credits of English grammar or composition.

GCU Course Options

  • UNV-104, 21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Literacy: 4 credits
  • ENG-105, English Composition I: 4 credits
  • ENG-106, English Composition II: 4 credits

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to express aspects of Christian heritage and worldview. Students are required to take CWV-101/CWV-301.

GCU Course Options

  • CWV-101, Christian Worldview: 4 credits
  • CWV-301, Christian Worldview: 4 credits

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to use various analytic and problem-solving skills to examine, evaluate, and/or challenge ideas and arguments (mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, geology, astronomy, physical geography, ecology, economics, theology, logic, philosophy, technology, statistics, accounting, etc.). Students are required to take 3 credits of intermediate algebra or higher.

GCU Course Options

  • MAT-154, Applications of College Algebra: 4 credits
  • MAT-144, College Mathematics: 4 credits
  • PHI-105, 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving: 4 credits
  • MAT-134, Applications of Algebra: 4 credits
  • BIO-220, Environmental Science: 4 credits

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to demonstrate awareness and appreciation of and empathy for differences in arts and culture, values, experiences, historical perspectives, and other aspects of life (psychology, sociology, government, Christian studies, Bible, geography, anthropology, economics, political science, child and family studies, law, ethics, crosscultural studies, history, art, music, dance, theater, applied arts, literature, health, etc.). If the predefined course is a part of the major, students need to take an additional course.

GCU Course Options

  • HIS-144, U.S. History Themes: 4 credits
  • PSY-100, Psychology in Everyday Life: 4 credits
  • SOC-100, Everyday Sociology: 4 credits

Required General Education Courses

Course Description

This course is designed to provide students opportunities to develop and strengthen skills necessary to enhance the undergraduate experience. It provides positive reinforcement of successful learning strategies and assistance with adaptation to the GCU academic environment.

Course Description

This is a course in writing academic prose, including various types of essays, arguments, and constructions. A writing intensive course.

Course Description

The course covers mathematics that matter in modern society. Key areas of focus include financial literacy, numerically-based decision making, growth, scale, and numerical applications. The course applies basic college-level mathematics to real-life problems and is appropriate for students whose majors do not require college algebra or higher.

Course Description

This course is the first of a two-course sequence examining the structure and function of the human body and mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within it. This portion includes the study of cells; tissues; genetics; and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Co-requisite: BIO-201L.

Course Description

This course involves a study of the gross anatomy and functions of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. This experiential lab involves gaining basic knowledge of the use of human cadavers, animal demonstrations, and computer-assisted instruction. Co-requisite: BIO-201.

Course Description

This course explores various types of research writing, with a focus on constructing essays, arguments, and research reports based on primary and secondary sources. A writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG-105.

Course Description

This foundation course in the science of behavior includes an overview of the history of psychology, the brain, motivation, emotion, sensory functions, perception, intelligence, gender and sexuality, social psychology, human development, learning psychopathology, and therapy.

Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the study of basic probability, descriptive and inferential statistics, and decision making. Emphasis is placed on measures of central tendency and dispersion, correlation, regression, discrete and continuous probability distributions, quality control population parameter estimation, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT-134, MAT-144 or MAT-154.

Course Description

A worldview acts like glasses through which one views the world. In this course, students explore the big questions that make up a worldview, questions like “Why are we here?” and “What is my purpose?” Students examine how Christians answer these questions and work on exploring their own worldviews, as well as learning how worldview influences one’s perceptions, decision making, and everyday life.

Course Description

This course presents a survey of the concepts, theories, and methods used by sociologists to describe and explain the effects of social structure on human behavior. It emphasizes the understanding and use of the sociological perspective in everyday life.

Course Description

This course introduces skills in therapeutic, interpersonal, and interprofessional communication and the relationship of effective communication to positive client outcomes. Students document client information manually and using the electronic health record. Students also explore the role of informatics in promoting holistic, client-centered care within diverse settings. Prerequisite: Admission into the nursing program.

Program Core Courses

Course Description

This course is the second of a two-course sequence examining the structure and function of the human body and mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within it. This portion includes the study of immunity; metabolism; energetics; fluid, electrolyte and acid-base balance; and the endocrine, hematologic, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Prerequisites: BIO-201 and BIO-201L. Co-requisite: BIO-202L.

Course Description

This course is a study of the gross anatomy and functions of the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, renal, and reproductive systems. The experiential lab involves an advanced exploration of concepts using human cadavers, animal demonstrations, and computer-assisted instruction. Prerequisites: BIO-201 and BIO-201L. Co-requisite: BIO-202.

Course Description

An introduction to the principles of chemistry; designed for students without a strong background in science. Topics covered include a survey of the chemical and physical properties of elements and compounds, chemical reactions, chemical energetics, acids and bases, and chemical bonding. An introduction to organic and biochemistry emphasizes the relationship between molecular structure and function. Co-requisite: CHM-101L.

Course Description

This lab course is designed to compliment and support the principles being addressed in CHM-101. Students learn basic lab techniques related to general and organic chemistry, building upon and strengthening foundational knowledge such as stoichiometry and reaction types. Additionally, some topics are addressed from a biochemical standpoint to highlight application to daily living. Co-requisite: CHM-101.

Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the principles and applications of microbiology and a study of the general characteristics of microorganisms, their activities, and their relationship to humans. Students develop understanding of microbial cell structure and function, microbial genetics, related pathologies, immunity, and other selected applied areas. Co-requisite: BIO-205L.

Course Description

The laboratory section of BIO-205 supports further learning surrounding principles gained in the lecture course. Students develop fundamental skills in microbiological laboratory techniques, microscopy methodologies, and the isolation and identification of pathogenic microorganisms. Co-requisite: BIO-205.

Course Description

This course is designed to bridge the gap between basic preclinical science courses and the clinical requirements of health care professionals. Critical thinking skills are enhanced with case studies that integrate nutritional and pharmacological concepts. Systematic studies focus on the etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations associated with various altered health states and diseases. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to correctly discuss a variety of disease states with health care professionals while addressing the following questions: How does a change in normal physiology cause the signs and symptoms of a given condition or disease? How do these physiological effects correlate to mechanisms of accurate diagnoses? Why is one treatment method chosen over another? How do different systems intricately interrelate to cause a clinical picture? This course does not substitute for BIO-483 or fulfill the Biology major requirement for pathophysiology. Prerequisites: BIO-201 and BIO-202.

Course Description

This is a course in developmental psychology with emphasis on the physical, social, cognitive, personality, and moral developments within an individual. The course is designed to provide an understanding of the transitions of life from conception to death. Prerequisite: PSY-102.

Course Description

This course provides a foundation of basic nutrition theory, with a focus on assessment, food components, exercise, nutrition, weight control, community programs, and resources. Application of these aspects is used to promote health and prevent illness.

Course Description

This course introduces the role of the professional nurse, the nursing process, and fundamental nursing skills. Students also learn concepts related to the health-wellness continuum and quality of life for the older adult population and explore diagnostic and laboratory test results. Health coaching, teaching, problem-solving, and intercollaborative skills are introduced and applied as a framework for clinical practice. Prerequisite: Admission into the nursing program. Co-Requisite: NUR-300C.

Course Description

In this clinical course, students use the nursing process to synthesize clinical data, knowledge of pharmacology, pathophysiology, evidence-based practice, and assessment findings with assistance to plan, prioritize, implement, and evaluate direct client care in assigned actual and simulated health care settings related to the care of the older adult population. Students are expected to integrate nursing skills and knowledge from prior and concurrent courses in providing holistic, safe, quality, client-centered care in the role of professional registered nurse. Clinical hours: 40. Prerequisite: Admission into the nursing program. Co-Requisite: NUR-300.

Course Description

In this course, students use the nursing process to systematically collect, validate, and communicate health, physical, and functional assessment data for diverse client populations across the life span in a variety of health care settings. Students demonstrate interview skills, history taking, and assessment techniques through supervised laboratory practice. Students consider the biopsychosocial, spiritual, and cultural aspects and legal and ethical implications of performing health and physical assessments and interpreting findings. Students develop fundamental clinical reasoning skills and create a holistic clinical picture of diverse client populations. Prerequisite: Admission into the nursing program.

Course Description

In this course, students examine essential pharmacotherapeutic agents used in health promotion, maintenance, and disease prevention of diverse populations across the life span. Emphasis is on the drug principles of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenetics/genomics. Students utilize nursing drug guides, references, and the nursing process as tools for addressing the physiological, psychosocial, developmental, and cultural responsibilities in administering drug therapy. Adhering to the rights of medication administration, students are expected to demonstrate beginning competency in safe medication administration. The legal and ethical responsibilities of medication administration are also explored. Foundational skills necessary for safely administering medication are practiced in a laboratory setting. Prerequisite: Admission into the nursing program.

Course Description

This course focuses on nursing care of adult clients. Students demonstrate advancing levels of competency in the role of the professional registered nurse, communication, and clinical reasoning to improve client outcomes with opportunity to care for clients. Students use the nursing process to synthesize clinical data, knowledge of pharmacology, pathophysiology, evidence-based practice, and assessment findings to plan, prioritize, implement, and evaluate nursing care in actual and simulated clinical settings for clients with acute, chronic, or terminal illnesses. Prerequisites: NUR-300, NUR-300C, NUR-315, NUR-316, and NUR-318. Co-Requisite: NUR-320C.

Course Description

In this clinical course, students use the nursing process to synthesize clinical data, knowledge of pharmacology, pathophysiology, evidence-based practice, and assessment findings to collaboratively plan, prioritize, implement, and evaluate direct client care in assigned actual and simulated health care settings related to the care of adults. Students are expected to integrate nursing skills and knowledge from prior and concurrent courses in providing holistic, safe, quality, client-centered care in the role of professional registered nurse. Clinical hours: 120. Prerequisites: NUR-300, NUR-300C, NUR-315, NUR-316, and NUR-318. Co-Requisite: NUR-320.

Course Description

This course focuses on utilizing the nursing process in providing mental health care in the community setting and inpatient psychiatric setting with individuals, families, and community groups. Emphasis is placed on therapeutic communication and nursing care at primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of mental health intervention. Concepts of environment, group process, family therapy, interdisciplinary collaboration, and affective skills of critical thinking are integrated with the biopsychosocial, spiritual, and cultural aspects of mental health nursing practice. Prerequisites: NUR-300, NUR-300C, NUR-315, NUR-316, and NUR-318. Co-Requisite: NUR-322C.

Course Description

In this clinical course, students use the nursing process to synthesize clinical data, knowledge of pharmacology, pathophysiology, evidence-based practice, and assessment findings to collaboratively plan, prioritize, implement, and evaluate direct client care in assigned actual and simulated health care settings related to mental health care. Students are expected to integrate nursing skills and knowledge from prior and concurrent courses in providing holistic, safe, quality, client-centered care in the role of professional registered nurse. Clinical hours: 36. Prerequisites: NUR-300, NUR-300C, NUR-315, NUR-316, and NUR-318. Co-Requisite: NUR-322.

Course Description

In this writing-intensive course, students are introduced to the research process and methodologies using qualitative and quantitative data. Students examine the processes required to translate and integrate evidence into nursing practice. Emphasis is on evaluation and application of scientific evidence affecting nurse-sensitive quality indicators. Students differentiate types and levels of evidence and identify appropriate sources that inform nursing practice. Strategies for implementation, methods of evaluation, and dissemination of research findings are discussed. This course also expands on informatics technology used to support data, information, and knowledge needs in the provision and delivery of nursing and health care. Prerequisites: NUR-300, NUR-300C, NUR-315, NUR-316, and NUR-318.

Course Description

This course focuses on the nursing care of the normal and high-risk childbearing family from preconception through the postpartum period. Emphasis is placed on family education, use of community resources, and alternatives to promote positive outcomes during the childbearing phase of family development. Prerequisites: NUR-320, NUR-320C, NUR-322, NUR-322C, and NUR-324. Co-Requisite: NUR-432C.

Course Description

In this clinical course, students use the nursing process to synthesize clinical data, knowledge of pharmacology, pathophysiology, evidence-based practice, and assessment findings to collaboratively plan, prioritize, implement, and evaluate direct client care in assigned actual and simulated health care settings related to the childbearing family. Students are expected to integrate nursing skills and knowledge from prior and concurrent courses in providing holistic, safe, quality, client-centered care in the role of professional registered nurse. Clinical hours: 36. Prerequisites: NUR-320, NUR-320C, NUR-322, NUR-322C, and NUR-324. Co-Requisite: NUR-432.

Course Description

This course integrates theories from nursing, child development, and family development related to the planning of care for children, adolescents, and their families who are well or experiencing acute or chronic illnesses. Emphasis is placed on teaching and on community resources related to the childrearing family. Prerequisites: NUR-320, NUR-320C, NUR-322, NUR-322C, and NUR-324. Co-Requisite: NUR-436C.

Course Description

In this clinical course, students use the nursing process to synthesize clinical data, knowledge of pharmacology, pathophysiology, evidence-based practice, and assessment findings to collaboratively plan, prioritize, implement, and evaluate direct client care in assigned actual and simulated health care settings related to the childrearing family. Students are expected to integrate nursing skills and knowledge from prior and concurrent courses in providing holistic, safe, quality, client-centered care in the role of professional registered nurse. Clinical hours: 36. Prerequisites: NUR-320, NUR-320C, NUR-322, NUR-322C, and NUR-324. Co-Requisite: NUR-436.

Course Description

This course focuses on the professional registered nurse's role and responsibilities in public and population health in a variety of community settings. Students gain a broader understanding of wellness promotion and disease prevention, client education, advocacy, ethical issues, epidemiological principles, and global health. Students examine social determinants of health for vulnerable populations along with disaster management and environmental health. Prerequisites: NUR-320, NUR-320C, NUR-322, NUR-322C, and NUR-324. Co-Requisite: NUR-438C.

Course Description

In this clinical course, students apply nursing principles in public and population health related to wellness promotion, disease prevention, and client education in a variety of community settings across the life span. Students are expected to integrate nursing skills and knowledge from prior and concurrent courses in providing holistic, safe, quality, client-centered care in the role of professional registered nurse. Clinical hours: 40. Prerequisites: NUR-320, NUR-320C, NUR-322, NUR-322C, and NUR-324. Co-Requisite: NUR-438.

Course Description

This course examines the foundations of health care policy, the financial structure of health care systems, and the regulatory environments that impact nursing practice and client care. Students explore the influence of the nursing profession on policy and regulation and address issues within health care organizations using leadership and management concepts. Emphasis is on integrating qualities of safety, accountability, advocacy, integrity, lifelong learning, clinical reasoning, competence, caring, and compassion towards building confidence as a professional registered nurse. Students also incorporate ethical and legal principles in exploring the relationship between law and ethics and its impact on diverse individuals, families, communities, and populations. Prerequisites: NUR-320, NUR-320C, NUR-322, NUR-322C, and NUR-324.

Course Description

In this course, students synthesize advanced medical-surgical concepts through evidence-based nursing care. Emphasis is on recognition of subtle changes in assessment findings and understanding and acting on their significance, the development of a plan of care in response to immediate and impending needs, and the application of advanced nursing skills. Students demonstrate advanced competency in the role of the professional registered nurse, participate within the interprofessional team, and demonstrate sound clinical judgment. Students use the nursing process to manage clients with higher levels of acuity by synthesizing clinical data, advanced knowledge of pharmacology, pathophysiology, evidence-based practice, and assessment findings to plan, prioritize, implement, and evaluate nursing care in actual and simulated complex care settings. Prerequisites: NUR-432, NUR-432C, NUR-436, NUR-436C, NUR-438, NUR-438C, and NUR-440. Co-Requisite: NUR-442C.

Course Description

In this clinical course, students use the nursing process to synthesize clinical data, knowledge of pharmacology, pathophysiology, evidence-based practice, and assessment findings to independently plan, prioritize, implement, and evaluate direct client care in assigned clinical and simulated health care settings related to complex care. Students are expected to integrate nursing skills and knowledge from prior and concurrent courses in providing holistic, safe, quality, client-centered care in the role of professional registered nurse. Clinical hours: 48. Prerequisites: NUR-432, NUR-432C, NUR-436, NUR-436C, NUR-438, NUR-438C, and NUR-440. Co-Requisite: NUR-442.

Course Description

This course addresses advanced medical-surgical concepts while supporting students as they develop and transition into the role of the professional registered nurse using current standards, critical-thinking, self-reflection, and nursing practice. Health promotion and disease prevention, health risks, and safety concepts are mastered with an emphasis on complex health issues. Clinical reasoning, concepts of caring, cultural competence, systems-based concepts, and competence in nursing skills are integrated to create meaningful learning experiences and career readiness preparation as students transition to professional practice. Prerequisites: NUR-432, NUR-432C, NUR-436, NUR-436C, NUR-438, NUR-438C, and NUR-440. Co-Requisite: NUR-444C.

Course Description

In this clinical course, students use the nursing process to synthesize clinical data, knowledge of pharmacology, pathophysiology, evidence-based practice, and assessment findings to independently plan, prioritize, implement, and evaluate direct client care in assigned clinical and simulated health care settings. Students are expected to integrate nursing skills and knowledge from prior and concurrent courses in providing holistic, safe, quality, client-centered care in the role of professional registered nurse. Clinical hours: 108. Prerequisites: NUR-432, NUR-432C, NUR-436, NUR-436C, NUR-438, NUR-438C, and NUR-440. Co-Requisite: NUR-444.

Course Description

This writing-intensive capstone provides students a culminating, professional experience synthesizing a clinical change project as a means of improving clinical practice and quality of care. This course assists students as they develop into effective change agents and advocates for improvements and quality care. Theories and concepts from liberal arts education, nursing practice, and PICOT principles are included as students progress through the final development and presentation of a clinical change project. Emphasis is placed on applying evidence-based practice in the clinical setting. Prerequisites: NUR-432, NUR-432C, NUR-436, NUR-436C, NUR-438, NUR-438C, and NUR-440.

Faculty Bios

Program Locations

Campus

Campus

Join Grand Canyon University’s vibrant and growing campus community, with daytime classes designed for traditional students. Immerse yourself in a full undergraduate experience, complete with curriculum designed within the context of our Christian worldview. New modern classrooms, suite-style residence halls, popular dining options, resort-style swimming pools and a focus on creating a dynamic student life make GCU a top choice for high school graduates and transfer students. Exciting events, well-known guest speakers and Division I athletics round out the traditional student experience. Our welcoming campus community is the perfect place to find your purpose.

* The Department of Education defines how an institution must calculate a program's On-Time Completion rate for federal disclosure purposes. The On-Time Completion rate is based on a program’s published required number of months to complete all degree requirements as provided in the institution’s catalog. Completion statistics are updated every January and are based on the cohort of students who graduated between 7/1 – 6/30 of the preceding year. The On-Time Completion rate is determined by the number of students in the cohort who completed the program within the published program length divided by the number of students in the cohort who graduated.

On-campus program disclosures

* The Arizona State Board of Nursing (AZBON) defines On-Time Graduation (OTG) as the percent of students who were admitted to the first clinical nursing course who graduated according to the published curriculum. Completion statistics are updated every January and are based on the cohort of students who graduated the preceding calendar year (Jan to Dec). The “First Clinical Nursing Course” is the initial required nursing course with clinical hours allotted (e.g. Fundamental of Nursing) regardless of the clinical setting. The On-Time Graduation rate is determined by the total number of graduates who graduated within 100% of the allotted program time. This represents Arizona only.

AZBON Additional Information

* Please refer to the Academic Catalog for more information. Program subject to change.