BS in Mechanical Engineering (BSME) Degree

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

Offered By: College of Science, Engineering, & Technology

Earn Your Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (BSME) Degree

Mechanical engineers have a direct impact on everyday life. Through the application of science and mathematics principles, mechanical engineers design innovative and economical solutions to problems that affect modern society. You can find your purpose in this field with the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree program at Grand Canyon University. Developed with industry guidance, this BSME program walks students through a range of mechanical engineering principles, applicable to research project, manufacturing industries and more.

GCU’s College of Science, Engineering and Technology offers this BSME degree program for students who are exceptional problem solvers and critical thinkers. It blends a multidisciplinary range of STEM subjects, including computer programming, mathematics, , chemistry and physics. Students are introduced to manufacturing processes and engineering economics to further enhance their career qualifications.

The Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering program is accredited by Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET.

Study Mechanical Engineering Bachelor of Science

Explore the analysis, design, use, and manufacture of mechanical devices as you learn from fully qualified and engaging instructors, and benefit from the diverse perspectives of your peers. Improve your communication skills as you work in collaborative team settings to develop innovative solutions to real-world problems. There is an emphasis on the role of servant leadership and ethics. As a private Christian school, GCU seeks to deliver a modern curriculum that instills the principles of faith and the glorification of God.

In courses including Structure and Property of Materials, Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, Principles of Mechanical Design, and Electro-Mechanical Systems and Controls, students will develop a mastery of the following topic areas:

  • The properties and structures of materials in terms of their actual atomic or molecular structure
  • The principles of thermodynamics, including the properties of ideal gases and water vapors, basic gas cycles, refrigeration, entropy and reacting mixtures
  • Concepts of conduction, convection, and radiation, as well as an introduction to mass transfer
  • Technical planning, requirements management, integration, verification, validation and production as they relate to integration of machine elements into a system
  • Integration of mechanical and electrical engineering disciplines in measurement and sensing, interfaces of devices to controllers, feedback control and more

The Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree program is a carefully designed blend of classroom instruction, hands-on experimentation, and self-study. Students have the opportunity to complete the Capstone Project I and II, in which they work in teams to design projects in areas of their interest. Students apply real-world research to develop project proposals and feasibility studies.

Explore Careers in Mechanical Engineering with a BSME Degree

From small components like microscale sensors to major systems like spacecraft, mechanical engineers are at the heart of scientific accomplishments and industrial innovations. With their knowledge of analysis, design, manufacture and operational processes, mechanical engineers can make everyday life safer and more efficient. The BS in mechanical engineering degree is a versatile choice that can enhance a graduate’s career trajectory.

Mechanical engineers work in many settings, including manufacturing plants, engineering consulting firms and technical and test centers. A diverse range of industries employ mechanical engineers, such as the biotechnology, automotive, energy and nanotechnology industries. Some specific jobs that may be related to this degree include:

  • Manufacturing engineering
  • Systems engineering
  • Mechanical design engineering
  • Project engineering
  • Engineering sales

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates job growth for mechanical engineers to increase by about 4% from 2019 to 2029, accounting for an estimated 12,400 new jobs in the field.*

For more information on the ABET accreditation of engineering programs and other university licensures, please visit our University Accreditation and Regulations Page.

*COVID-19 has adversely affected the global economy and data from 2020 may be atypical compared to prior years. The pandemic may impact the predicted future workforce outcomes indicated by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics as well. Accordingly, data shown is based on 2019, which can be found here: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Mechanical Engineers.

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TOTAL CREDITS & COURSE LENGTH:
Total Credits: 128
Campus: 15 weeks [More Info]

TRANSFER CREDITS:
Up to 90 credits, only 84 can be lower division
TUITION RATE:
Campus: $8,250 per semester [More Info]

Course List

General Education Requirements:
34-40 credits
Major:
88 credits
Open Elective Credits:
0-6 credits
Total Degree Requirements:
128 credits

General Education Requirements

General Education coursework prepares Grand Canyon University graduates to think critically, communicate clearly, live responsibly in a diverse world, and thoughtfully integrate their faith and ethical convictions into all dimensions of life. These competencies, essential to an effective and satisfying life, are outlined in the General Education Learner Outcomes. General Education courses embody the breadth of human understanding and creativity contained in the liberal arts and sciences tradition. Students take an array of foundational knowledge courses that promote expanded knowledge, insight, and the outcomes identified in the University's General Education Competencies. The knowledge and skills students acquire through these courses serve as a foundation for successful careers and lifelong journeys of growing understanding and wisdom.

Requirements

Upon completion of the Grand Canyon University's University Foundation experience, students will be able to demonstrate competency in the areas of academic skills and self-leadership. They will be able to articulate the range of resources available to assist them, explore career options related to their area of study, and have knowledge of Grand Canyon's community. Students will be able to demonstrate foundational academic success skills, explore GCU resources (CLA, Library, Career Center, ADA office, etc), articulate strategies of self-leadership and management and recognize opportunities to engage in the GCU community.

Course Options

  • UNV-112, Success in Science, Engineering and Technology & Lab: 4
  • UNV-103, University Success: 4
  • UNV-303, University Success: 4
  • UNV-108, University Success in the College of Education: 4

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to construct rhetorically effective communications appropriate to diverse audiences, purposes, and occasions (English composition, communication, critical reading, foreign language, sign language, etc.). Students are required to take 3 credits of English grammar or composition.

Course Options

  • UNV-104, 21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Literacy: 4
  • ENG-105, English Composition I: 4
  • ENG-106, English Composition II: 4

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to express aspects of Christian heritage and worldview. Students are required to take CWV-101/CWV-301.

Course Options

  • CWV-101, Christian Worldview: 4
  • CWV-301, Christian Worldview: 4

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to use various analytic and problem-solving skills to examine, evaluate, and/or challenge ideas and arguments (mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, geology, astronomy, physical geography, ecology, economics, theology, logic, philosophy, technology, statistics, accounting, etc.). Students are required to take 3 credits of intermediate algebra or higher.

Course Options

  • MAT-154, Applications of College Algebra: 4
  • MAT-144, College Mathematics: 4
  • PHI-105, 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving: 4
  • BIO-220, Environmental Science: 4

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to demonstrate awareness and appreciation of and empathy for differences in arts and culture, values, experiences, historical perspectives, and other aspects of life (psychology, sociology, government, Christian studies, Bible, geography, anthropology, economics, political science, child and family studies, law, ethics, cross-cultural studies, history, art, music, dance, theater, applied arts, literature, health, etc.). If the predefined course is a part of the major, students need to take an additional course.

Course Options

  • HIS-144, U.S. History Themes: 4
  • PSY-102, General Psychology: 4
  • SOC-100, Everyday Sociology: 4

Required General Education Courses

Course Description

This is the first course of a two-semester introduction to chemistry intended for undergraduates pursuing careers in the health professions and others desiring a firm foundation in chemistry. The course assumes no prior knowledge of chemistry and begins with basic concepts. Topics include an introduction to the scientific method, dimensional analysis, atomic structure, nomenclature, stoichiometry and chemical reactions, the gas laws, thermodynamics, chemical bonding, and properties of solutions. Co-Requisite: CHM-113L.

Course Description

The laboratory section of CHM-113 reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. Experiments include determination of density, classification of chemical reactions, the gas laws, determination of enthalpy change using calorimetry, and determination of empirical formula. Co-Requisite: CHM-113.

Course Description

This course is founded in the application of mathematics to engineering problems and processes. The course begins with foundations in algebraic manipulation, progresses into trigonometric models, complex numbers, signal processing, introduction to matrices and system equations, differentiation and integration, and differential equations all applied to the solution to engineering problems. Prerequisite: MAT-154. Co-Requisite: ESG-162L.

Course Description

The engineering math labs are the hands on applications of the foundational mathematics concepts applied to engineering problems in the engineering math course. The labs will apply algebra, trigonometry, matrices, differential and integral calculus, and differential equations to various engineering problems. Prerequisite: MAT-154. Co-Requisite: ESG-162.

Course Description

This course introduces the fundamentals of the engineering design methodology and the product development process.. Students will learn the importance of listening to the voice of the customer and how to incorporate those desires into a product using design for X principles. Students will develop verification and validation tests and learn how those become formalized qualification or acceptance processes. Prerequisites: ESG-162 and ESG-162L or MAT-154.

Course Description

This course introduces students to engineering documentation, tolerances, and standards. Typical fabrication tools common in a machine shop and the impact those tools have on design details will be covered. The students will work on several multi-disciplined projects through the semester. Prerequisites: ESG-162 and ESG-162L. Co-Requisites: ESG-210 and ESG-251.

Course Description

This course is a calculus-based study of basic concepts of physics, including motion; forces; energy; the properties of solids, liquids, and gases; and heat and thermodynamics. The mathematics used includes algebra, trigonometry, and vector analysis. A primary course goal is to build a functional knowledge that allows students to more fully understand the physical world and to apply that understanding to other areas of the natural and mathematical sciences. Conceptual, visual, graphical, and mathematical models of physical phenomena are stressed. Students build critical thinking skills by engaging in individual and group problem-solving sessions. Prerequisite: ESG-162, ESG-162L or MAT-261. Co-Requisite: MAT-262, PHY-121L.

Course Description

This calculus-based course utilizes lab experimentation to practice concepts of physical principles introduced in the PHY-121 lecture course. Students are able to perform the proper analysis and calculations to arrive at the correct quantifiable result when confronted with equations involving gravity, sound, energy, and motion. Prerequisite: ESG-162, ESG-162L or MAT-261. Co-Requisite: MAT-262, PHY-121.

Course Description

This course provides an insight into professional communications and conduct associated with careers in science, engineering and technology. Students learn about the changing modes of communication in these disciplines recognizing the advances in digital communications. They gain practical experience in developing and supporting a thesis or position in written, oral and visual presentations. Students will explore concepts and issues in professional ethics and conduct such as privacy, discrimination, workplace etiquette, cyber-ethics, network and data security, identity theft, ownership rights and intellectual property. This is a writing intensive course.

Core Courses

Course Description

This is the second course of a two-semester introduction to chemistry intended for undergraduates pursuing careers in the health professions and others desiring a firm foundation in chemistry. Upon successful completion of this course, students demonstrate knowledge and/or skill in solving problems involving the principles of chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, and thermodynamics; understanding chemical reactions using kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics; comparing and contrasting the principal theories of acids and bases; solving equilibrium involving acids, bases, and buffers; describing solubility equilibrium; describing terms associated with electrochemistry and solving problems associated with electrochemistry; and describing fundamentals and applications of nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry. Prerequisites: CHM-113 and MAT-154 or higher. Co-Requisite: CHM-115L.

Course Description

The laboratory section of CHM-115 reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. Experiments include determination of rate law, examples of Le Châtelier’s principle, the use of pH indicators, buffer preparation, experimental determination of thermodynamic quantities, the use of electrochemical cells, and qualitative and quantitative analysis. Prerequisites: CHM-113L and MAT-154 or higher. Co-Requisite: CHM-115.

Course Description

This course provides a rigorous treatment of the concepts and methods of elementary calculus and its application to real-world problems. Topics include differentiation, optimization, and integration.  Software is utilized to facilitate problem analysis and graphing.  Prerequisite: MAT-261.

Course Description

This course introduces students to the basics of computer programming. Students will learn to develop algorithms to solve engineering problems, and the implementation of those algorithms in the C language. This course will include using C program for embedded devices for interacting with the world around them. Topics include assembly language, C programming language, and real time programming. MATLAB will be taught in the course to introduce students to rapid development tools and allow for flexibility in prototyping. Concepts of Object Oriented (OO) programming will be included in the MATLAB section of this course. Hands-on activities focus on writing code that implements concepts discussed in lecture and on gaining initial exposure to common microcontrollers. Prerequisites: ESG-162 and ESG-162L or MAT-261.

Course Description

This course provides a rigorous treatment of the concepts and methods of integral, multivariable, and vector calculus and its application to real-world problems. Prerequisite: MAT-262.

Course Description

This course introduces students to the basics of computer-aided design. Students will learn to produce great designs using computer-aided design software. Topics include 2-D and 3-D design and modeling, mechanical tolerances, and electrical and mechanical design integration. Hands-on activities focus on the design and integration of different subsystems, electrical and mechanical. Prerequisites: ESG-162 and ESG-162L.

Course Description

This class will introduce statistical process control and teach proper engineering experimental design and analysis techniques. Concepts introduced will include process variability, statistical controls, factorial, blocking and confounding as applied to engineering problems. Prerequisite: MAT-262.

Course Description

This calculus-based course is the second in a 1-year introductory physics sequence. In this course, the basics of three areas in physics are covered, including electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. The sequence of topics includes an introduction to electric and magnetic fields. This is followed by the nature of light as an electromagnetic wave and topics associated with geometric optics. The final topic discussed in the course is quantum mechanics. Prerequisites: MAT-264, PHY-121, and PHY-121L. Co-Requisite: PHY-122L.

Course Description

This course utilizes lab experimentation to practice concepts of physical principles introduced in the PHY-122 lecture course. Some of the topics students understand and analyze involve the relationship between electric charges and insulators/conductors, magnetism in physics, energy transformations in electric circuits, the relationship between magnetism and electricity, and how they relate to the medical industry. Prerequisites: MAT-264, PHY-121, and PHY-121L. Co-Requisite: PHY-122.

Course Description

This course focuses on solutions and qualitative study of linear systems of ordinary differential equations, and on the analysis of classical partial differential equations. Topics include first- and second-order equations; series solutions; Laplace transform solutions; higher order equations; Fourier series; second-order partial differential equations. Boundary value problems, electrostatics, and quantum mechanics provide the main context in this course. Prerequisite: MAT-253 or MAT-264.

Course Description

This course focus is on the analysis of two- and three-dimensional forces on a system in an equilibrium (static) state. Further, it discusses real world applications for static analyses via simple trusses, frames, machines, and beams. Additional topics covered include properties of areas, second moments, internal forces in beams, laws of friction, and static simulation in Solidworks. Prerequisite: PHY-121, PHY-121L, ESG-251.

Course Description

This course introduces the principles of kinematics and kinetics as they apply to engineering systems and analyses. This course covers Newton’s second law, work-energy and power, impulse and momentum methods. Additional topics include vibrations and an introduction to transient responses. Simulation with Solidworks and MATlab are also covered. Prerequisite: ESG-260. Co-Requisite: MEE-360L.

Course Description

This course utilizes lab experimentation and computer simulation to further explore the concepts and principles introduced in the MEE-360 lecture course. Students will learn how to setup and perform engineering tests and simulations in the context of complex, real-world engineering problems. Prerequisite: ESG-260. Co-Requisite: MEE-360.

Course Description

This course provides students with a strong foundation in core areas of electrical engineering. Students will learn the main ideas of circuits and their enabling role in electrical engineering components, devices, and systems. The course offers in-depth coverage of AC & DC circuits, circuit analysis, filters, impedance, power transfer, applications of Laplace transforms, and op-amps. Prerequisites: MAT-262, PHY-121 and PHY-121L. Co-Requisite: PHY-122, PHY-122L, EEE-202L.

Course Description

The laboratory section of EEE-202 reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. Hands-on activities focus problem solving using scientific computation tools, simulations, and various programming languages. Prerequisites: MAT-262, PHY-121 and PHY-121L. Co-Requisite: PHY-122, PHY-122L, EEE-202.

Course Description

This course covers the principles of thermodynamics, including properties of ideal gases and water vapors, and the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Additional topics include closed systems and control volume, basic gas and vapor cycles, basic refrigeration, entropy, and an introduction to thermodynamics of reacting mixtures. Students will analyze simple to complex thermodynamic problems. Prerequisites: MAT-264, PHY-121 and PHY-121L.

Course Description

This course covers concepts and theories of internal force, stress, strain, and strength of structural elements under static loading conditions. The course also examines constitutive behavior for linear elastic structures and deflection and stress analysis procedures for bars, beams, and shafts. Students will examine and analyze various modes of failure of solid materials. Prerequisites: ESG-250 or ESG-251, ESG-260 or ESG-360, and MAT-364.

Course Description

This course covers basic concepts in materials structure and its relation to properties. The course will provide students with a broad overview of materials science and engineering. The goal of this course is to understand the fundamental reasons that materials have the properties they do. Students examine properties of interesting materials and try to understand them in terms of their actual atomic or molecular structure. Prerequisite: CHM-115, CHM-115L, PHY-122, PHY-122L, MAT-364. Co-Requisite: MEE-340L.

Course Description

This is the lab section of MEE-340. The course reinforces theoretical concepts covered in lecture and with hands-on activities. Students conduct lab experiments to better understand how certain properties of materials manifest themselves. Prerequisite: CHM-115, CHM-115L, PHY-122, PHY-122L, MAT-364. Co-Requisite: MEE-340.

Course Description

This course is an introduction to fluid statics, laminar and turbulent flow, pipe flow, lift and drag and measurement technics. Students will learn control volume analysis. Prerequisites: ESG-251, PHY-122, PHY-122L, STG-330, and MAT-364.

Course Description

This course introduces students to the processes of mathematical modeling and analysis of dynamic systems with mechanical, thermal, electrical and fluid elements. Topics covered include: time domain solutions, analog computer simulation, linearization techniques, block diagram representation, numerical methods and frequency domain solutions. Hands-on lab activities enhance students’ ability to mathematically analyze components and systems for mechanical performance. Prerequisites: ESG-345 or ESG-330 or STG-345, and EEE-202/EEE-202L.

Course Description

This course will cover the basics of managing an engineering project, including: project planning, initiating of project, implementation of the project plan, and completion of the project. Students will be taught how to pitch their idea for funding, both in written form and in oral form, as well as prepare a formal written funding proposal. The class will cover the basics of Engineering Economics and introduction to how this topic is covered on the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam. Throughout the semester, the students will use the management and economic concepts learned to develop a portfolio and proposal for a capstone project to be completed in the following year. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ESG-210 and ESG-220.

Course Description

This course is an introduction to heat transfer. Concepts of conduction, convection, and radiation will be explored. Methods for analysis of steady and unsteady conduction, laminar and turbulent convection, and radiation will be introduced. Heat exchanger design and analysis methods will be addressed. The concept of mass transfer will also be introduced. Students will use learn simulation methods using the SolidWorks software. Prerequisite: ESG-345.

Course Description

This course introduces standard mechanical tests and computer based data acquisition techniques, e.g., installing thermocouples, strain gages, positioning static and probes. ASME and ASTM test codes are studied, as are OSHA standards. The course examines how various physical property and system performance tests are set up, conducted, and analyzed. Prerequisites: EEE-202, EEE-202L, and MAT-364.

Course Description

This course covers the integration of machine elements into a system and the verification that the resulting system performs as intended in its operational environment. Areas of study include technical planning, requirements management, integration, verification, validation, and production. Prerequisites: (MEE-352 and MEE-360 and MEE-360L) or (ESG-360).

Course Description

The first capstone course provides students the opportunity to work in teams to tackle real world applied research and design projects in their chosen area of interest. Students develop a project proposal, conduct a feasibility study, learn to protect intellectual property, develop teamwork skills, budgets, and a schedule for completing the project. Students conduct extensive research, integrate information from multiple sources, and work with a mentor through multiple cycles of feedback and revisions. Students use this course to further develop technical writing and business presentation skills. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ESG-395.

Course Description

Machine elements are selected and designed based on theories and methods developed in statics, dynamics, and strength of materials. Individual components will also be analyzed use CAE methods. Prerequisite: MEE-473.

Course Description

This course is an overview of manufacturing processes and methods. Processes may include casting and molding, forming, machining, metrology, welding, joining, and computer-aided manufacturing. Additional topics include product design, material selection, process planning, and manufacturing automation. Process capabilities, limitations, and design for manufacturability will be examined. Prerequisite: ESG-220.

Course Description

The second capstone course provides students the opportunity to implement and present the applied research project designed, planned, and started in the first capstone course. The capstone project is a culmination of the learning experiences in an engineering program. Students conduct extensive research, integrate information from multiple sources, and work with a mentor through multiple cycles of feedback and revision. Prerequisite: ESG-451.

Course Description

This course is an introduction to designing electro-mechanical systems, or mechatronics, which require integration of the mechanical and electrical engineering disciplines within a unified framework. Topics covered in the course include: application of electro-mechanical systems; measurement and sensing; actuators; interfacing of devices to controllers; programming controllers for real-time tasks; feedback control of electro-mechanical systems including servo controls. Prerequisite: MEE-460 or ESG-330.

Course Description

Apply the stochastic process to the modeling and solution of the engineering problems. The course introduces the students to modeling, quantification, and analysis of uncertainty in engineering problems; all building into an introduction to Markov chains, random walks, and Galton-Watson tree and their applications in engineering. Prerequisite: MAT-364.

Locations

GCU Campus Student


Join Grand Canyon University’s vibrant and growing campus community, with daytime classes designed for traditional students. Immerse yourself in a full undergraduate experience, complete with curriculum designed within the context of our Christian worldview.

* Please note that this list may contain programs and courses not presently offered, as availability may vary depending on class size, enrollment and other contributing factors. If you are interested in a program or course listed herein please first contact your University Counselor for the most current information regarding availability.

* Please refer to the Academic Catalog for more information. Programs or courses subject to change.

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