Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Technology: Mechatronics Emphasis

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Technology with an Emphasis in Mechatronics

Offered By: College of Engineering and Technology

Study Mechatronics Curriculum in This Specialized Engineering Program

In mechanical engineering, mechatronics is a multidisciplinary subfield that combines the principles and applications of mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, control systems and even robotics. In this Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Technology with an Emphasis in Mechatronics program at Grand Canyon University, you will be taught the practical applications of mechanical engineering principles alongside mechatronics techniques. 

The mechanical engineering mechatronics subfield may be an ideal career option if you have a passion for problem-solving and creative innovation. Throughout the program, you will have the opportunity to apply the principles of engineering to hands-on projects. 

The mechatronics curriculum teaches the skills necessary to design, build and operate smart machines, including automated systems, intelligent products and robots, as well as the software and hardware needed to make it all work.  

The bachelor’s in engineering technology degree with a mechatronics emphasis is offered by the College of Engineering and Technology. This program integrates computer programming and electrical and mechanical engineering principles in the following areas:

  • Computerized design and manufacturing tools
  • Fluid and thermal transport
  • Materials and processes
  • Controls and instrumentation
  • Industrial automation
  • Electrical troubleshooting
  • Electromechanical systems principles

The mechatronics curriculum integrates math, natural sciences and computer programming with an emphasis on critical thinking, problem-solving, practical applications and project management experience. 

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Female mechatronics engineering degree emphasis student using hardware in class

Benefits of a BS in Mechanical Engineering Technology: Mechatronics Emphasis From GCU

Earning a degree from GCU can provide more than just a career-focused education. As a Christian university, GCU emphasizes the role of professional ethics in all its classrooms with faith-integrated courses. As a student, you are taught and encouraged to apply Christian principles of stewardship and discipline in all areas of life, including your professional career. 

Mechanical engineering mechatronics students can develop skills to communicate effectively while working on diverse teams. They may also position themselves to pursue advanced learning and potential leadership roles.

Mechatronics Courses and Skills Taught in This Engineering Degree 

The mechatronics curriculum was developed with industry guidance to address the broad foundational knowledge and skills required in fields such as:

  • Mechanical engineering technology
  • Mechatronics
  • Application engineering
  • Test engineering
  • Project engineering
  • Production engineering
  • Product development engineering
  • Manufacturing engineering

The BS in Mechanical Engineering Technology program begins by examining foundational knowledge in science and mathematics, with a focus on physics and computer science. Advanced topic areas include static and dynamic loading conditions in mechanical systems, 2D and 3D design modeling in CAD software, and the analysis of fluid and heat transfer. Other core competencies of the mechanical engineering mechatronics program include the following:

  • Computerized design and manufacturing processes
  • Applications of instrumentation and machine shop tools
  • Probability and statistics
  • Mechatronic control systems
  • Analysis of electric circuits under various loading conditions
  • The physical and chemical properties of materials used in industry
  • Machine design elements and kinematics
  • Preventive maintenance and quality control to increase product reliability

In addition, you will complete two capstone projects. These provide hands-on opportunities to work in teams and with a mentor to tackle applied research and design projects in your area of interest. You may participate in internships and assigned projects in collaboration with engineering professionals. GCU also offers extensive STEM resources to support you throughout your program.

Types of Mechanical Engineering Technology and Mechatronics Careers

Within this emerging field, you can prepare for mechatronics-related careers in development and manufacturing. Employers need qualified mechatronics engineers to work in industries such as:

  • Machinery manufacturing
  • Engineering services
  • Transportation equipment manufacturing
  • Semiconductor and other electronic component manufacturing
  • Navigational and control instruments manufacturing

These industries, among others, typically offer positions focused on product design, development, manufacturing and quality. 

Although there are many positions mechanical engineering mechatronics graduates can pursue with a bachelor’s degree, you may choose to enhance your career qualifications by pursuing one of GCU’s many STEM master’s degrees.2 

Institutionally Accredited Engineering Programs

Engineering and Technology Accreditation Commission LogoThis BS in Mechanical Engineering Technology program is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, under the General Criteria and the Mechanical Engineering Technology Program Criteria. When considering your choice of degree programs and your intended career, it’s important to verify that the school you choose is accredited. Accreditation serves as a benchmark for education quality. GCU takes pride in its institutional accreditation, endorsed by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC).

BS in Mechanical Engineering Technology: Mechatronics Emphasis FAQs

Any decision that will impact your future career is a significant one. Take the time to research potential career paths so that you can make an informed decision for your future. The following frequently asked questions and answers can help you get started.

The fusion of mechanical engineering with electronics offers the opportunity for businesses to create better efficiencies and reduce overall costs.3 Employers in manufacturing and high-tech fields can turn to these specialized engineers for forward-looking innovations and improvements to existing technologies. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) does not offer job growth data for mechatronics specialists alone, but it does offer a projected job growth rate for all types of mechanical engineers combined. The BLS estimates job growth for mechanical engineers to be 10% from 2022 to 2032, much faster than average, accounting for an estimated increase of 28,500 jobs in the field.4 

No degree program can guarantee any particular career outcome. However, there are various types of mechatronics careers you may have the opportunity to pursue with this degree. Industries such as automotive and pharmaceutical manufacturing, agricultural, biotechnology and aerospace often hire qualified mechatronics degree graduates to work with smart technologies and complex machines.5 Job titles may include:

  • Electro-mechanical engineers and technologists
  • Mechatronics engineers and technologists
  • Mechanical engineers and technologists
  • Mechanical drafters 

To become a qualified mechatronics engineer, a bachelor’s degree in a field such as mechatronics engineering or mechanical engineering technology is typically required for this field. Entry-level engineers will then need to pass the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) licensure exam to be called engineer interns (EIs) or engineers in training (EITs). After meeting professional work requirements, you can then be eligible to sit for the Professional Engineering (PE) exam. Although these are national exams, specific engineering licensure requirements can vary from state to state.2 You should research the requirements for the state in which you plan to work. 

Robotics engineering is a subfield of mechatronics engineering, which is itself a subfield of mechanical engineering. Mechatronics engineers often work on all types of automated machinery. Their work fuses together the disciplines of mechanical engineering, computer science and electrical/electronic engineering. Robotics technology is a type of automated system. Robotics engineers design robotic devices to perform tasks.6

Although it’s a specialized subfield, mechatronics offers a broad spectrum of possibilities. A mechatronics engineer may pursue work across a range of industries — from agriculture to automotive design to biotechnology, and many more. Some of the types of projects that a mechatronics engineer might work on include:5

  • The creation of control systems for robotic surgical platforms
  • The design of unmanned spacecraft or aircraft for the purpose of furthering scientific exploration
  • The development of hazardous waste removal machinery in order to improve safety standards through automated processes

Explore the exciting intersection of mechanical engineering and electronics in mechatronics courses at GCU. Apply today for enrollment in our mechanical engineering mechatronics emphasis program and prepare to pursue a future on the forefront of scientific innovation.

1 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2022, Sept. 8). Electro-mechanical and mechatronics technologists and technicians. Occupational Outlook Handbook. Retrieved Sept. 5, 2023. 

2 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2023, Feb. 6). How to become a mechanical engineer. Occupational Outlook Handbook. Retrieved September 5, 2023. 

3 Plavicheanu, P. (2016, Aug. 4). Mechatronics efficiency achieved by designing for functional excellence. Control Engineering. Retrieved on September 14, 2023. 

4 COVID-19 has adversely affected the global economy and data from 2020 may be atypical compared to prior years. The pandemic may impact the predicted future workforce outcomes indicated by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics as well. Accordingly, data shown is based on Aug. 2023, which can be found here: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Mechanical Engineers, Job Outlook, retrieved in Sept. 2023. 

5 Martin, S. (2018, Oct. 18). Robotics vs. mechatronics: knowing the difference. Electronics 360. Retrieved Sept. 5, 2023. 

6 Indeed. (2022, Aug. 12). 19 mechatronics careers with salaries and duties. Indeed. Retrieved Sept. 5, 2023. 

TOTAL CREDITS & COURSE LENGTH:
Total Credits: 128
Campus: 15 weeks
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TRANSFER CREDITS:
Up to 90 credits, only 84 can be lower division
TUITION RATE:
Campus: $8,250 per semester [More Info]

Course List

General Education Requirements:
34-40 credits
Major:
88 credits
Open Elective Credits:
0-6 credits
Degree Requirements:
128 credits

General Education Requirements

General Education coursework prepares Grand Canyon University graduates to think critically, communicate clearly, live responsibly in a diverse world, and thoughtfully integrate their faith and ethical convictions into all dimensions of life. These competencies, essential to an effective and satisfying life, are outlined in the General Education Learner Outcomes. General Education courses embody the breadth of human understanding and creativity contained in the liberal arts and sciences tradition. Students take an array of foundational knowledge courses that promote expanded knowledge, insight, and the outcomes identified in the University's General Education Competencies. The knowledge and skills students acquire through these courses serve as a foundation for successful careers and lifelong journeys of growing understanding and wisdom.

Requirements

Upon completion of the Grand Canyon University's University Foundation experience, students will be able to demonstrate competency in the areas of academic skills and self-leadership. They will be able to articulate the range of resources available to assist them, explore career options related to their area of study, and have knowledge of Grand Canyon's community. Students will be able to demonstrate foundational academic success skills, explore GCU resources (CLA, Library, Career Center, ADA office, etc), articulate strategies of self-leadership and management and recognize opportunities to engage in the GCU community.

Course Options

  • UNV-103, University Success: 4
  • UNV-303, University Success: 4
  • UNV-108, University Success in the College of Education: 4

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to construct rhetorically effective communications appropriate to diverse audiences, purposes, and occasions (English composition, communication, critical reading, foreign language, sign language, etc.). Students are required to take 3 credits of English grammar or composition.

Course Options

  • UNV-104, 21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Literacy: 4
  • ENG-105, English Composition I: 4
  • ENG-106, English Composition II: 4

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to express aspects of Christian heritage and worldview. Students are required to take CWV-101/CWV-301.

Course Options

  • CWV-101, Christian Worldview: 4
  • CWV-301, Christian Worldview: 4

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to use various analytic and problem-solving skills to examine, evaluate, and/or challenge ideas and arguments (mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, geology, astronomy, physical geography, ecology, economics, theology, logic, philosophy, technology, statistics, accounting, etc.). Students are required to take 3 credits of intermediate algebra or higher.

Course Options

  • MAT-154, Applications of College Algebra: 4
  • MAT-144, College Mathematics: 4
  • PHI-105, 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving: 4
  • BIO-220, Environmental Science: 4

Requirements

Graduates of Grand Canyon University will be able to demonstrate awareness and appreciation of and empathy for differences in arts and culture, values, experiences, historical perspectives, and other aspects of life (psychology, sociology, government, Christian studies, Bible, geography, anthropology, economics, political science, child and family studies, law, ethics, cross-cultural studies, history, art, music, dance, theater, applied arts, literature, health, etc.). If the predefined course is a part of the major, students need to take an additional course.

Course Options

  • HIS-144, U.S. History Themes: 4
  • PSY-102, General Psychology: 4
  • SOC-100, Everyday Sociology: 4

Required General Education Courses

Course Description

This is the first course of a two-semester introduction to chemistry intended for undergraduates pursuing careers in the health professions and others desiring a firm foundation in chemistry. The course assumes no prior knowledge of chemistry and begins with basic concepts. Topics include an introduction to the scientific method, dimensional analysis, atomic structure, nomenclature, stoichiometry and chemical reactions, the gas laws, thermodynamics, chemical bonding, and properties of solutions. Co-Requisite: CHM-113L.

Course Description

The laboratory section of CHM-113 reinforces and expands learning of principles introduced in the lecture course. Experiments include determination of density, classification of chemical reactions, the gas laws, determination of enthalpy change using calorimetry, and determination of empirical formula. Co-Requisite: CHM-113.

Course Description

This course is founded in the application of mathematics to engineering problems and processes. The course begins with foundations in algebraic manipulation, progresses into trigonometric models, complex numbers, signal processing, introduction to matrices and system equations, differentiation and integration, and differential equations all applied to the solution to engineering problems. Course content cannot be met by a transfer course. Prerequisite: MAT-154. Co-Requisite: ESG-162L.

Course Description

The engineering math labs are the hands on applications of the foundational mathematics concepts applied to engineering problems in the engineering math course. The labs will apply algebra, trigonometry, matrices, differential and integral calculus, and differential equations to various engineering problems. Course content cannot be met by a transfer course. Prerequisite: MAT-154. Co-Requisite: ESG-162.

Course Description

This course introduces the fundamentals of the engineering design methodology and the product development process.. Students will learn the importance of listening to the voice of the customer and how to incorporate those desires into a product using design for X principles. Students will develop verification and validation tests and learn how those become formalized qualification or acceptance processes. Prerequisites: ESG-162 and ESG-162L or MAT-154 or higher subsequent math course.

Course Description

This course introduces students to engineering documentation, tolerances, and standards. Typical fabrication tools common in a machine shop and the impact those tools have on design details will be covered. The students will work on several multi-disciplined projects through the semester. Prerequisites: ESG-162 and ESG-162L. Co-Requisites: ESG-210 and ESG-251.

Course Description

This course covers the basics of managing an engineering project, including: project planning, initiating of the project, implementation of the project plan, and completion of the project. Students will learn how to pitch their idea for funding, both in written form and in oral form, as well as how to prepare a formal written funding proposal. The class will cover the basics of engineering economics and introduce how this topic is covered on the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam. Throughout the semester, the students will use the management and economic concepts learned to develop a portfolio and proposal for a capstone project to be completed in the following year. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ESG-210 and ESG-220.

Core Courses

Course Description

This course provides a rigorous treatment of the concepts and methods of elementary calculus and its application to real-world problems. Topics include differentiation, optimization, and integration.  Software is utilized to facilitate problem analysis and graphing. Prerequisite: MAT-261 or ESG-162/162L.

Course Description

This course introduces students to the basics of computer programming. Students will learn to develop algorithms to solve engineering problems, and the implementation of those algorithms in the C language. This course will include using C program for embedded devices for interacting with the world around them. Topics include assembly language, C programming language, and real time programming. MATLAB will be taught in the course to introduce students to rapid development tools and allow for flexibility in prototyping. Concepts of Object Oriented (OO) programming will be included in the MATLAB section of this course. Hands-on activities focus on writing code that implements concepts discussed in lecture and on gaining initial exposure to common microcontrollers. Prerequisites: ESG-162 and ESG-162L or MAT-261.

Course Description

This course provides a rigorous treatment of the concepts and methods of integral, multivariable, and vector calculus and its application to real-world problems. Prerequisite: MAT-262.

Course Description

This course is a calculus-based study of basic concepts of physics, including motion; forces; energy; the properties of solids, liquids, and gases; and heat and thermodynamics. The mathematics used includes algebra, trigonometry, and vector analysis. A primary course goal is to build a functional knowledge that allows students to more fully understand the physical world and to apply that understanding to other areas of the natural and mathematical sciences. Conceptual, visual, graphical, and mathematical models of physical phenomena are stressed. Students build critical thinking skills by engaging in individual and group problem-solving sessions. Prerequisite: MAT-262. Co-Requisite: PHY-121L.

Course Description

This calculus-based course utilizes lab experimentation to practice concepts of physical principles introduced in the PHY-121 lecture course. Students are able to perform the proper analysis and calculations to arrive at the correct quantifiable result when confronted with equations involving gravity, sound, energy, and motion. Prerequisite: MAT-262. Co-Requisite: PHY-121.

Course Description

This course introduces students to the basics of computer-aided design. Students will learn to produce great designs using computer-aided design software. Topics include 2-D and 3-D design and modeling, mechanical tolerances, and electrical and mechanical design integration. Hands-on activities focus on the design and integration of different subsystems, electrical and mechanical. Prerequisites: ESG-162 and ESG-162L.

Course Description

This course emphasizes appropriate machine shop tool selection for the job in regard to cutting, drilling, milling, and turning. Hands-on activities in the machine shops focus on safe operation of the equipment. The course also covers the three principle orthographic views of an object and how to draw by hand for engineering applications. Co-Requisite: ESG-251.

Course Description

This calculus-based course is the second in a 1-year introductory physics sequence. In this course, the basics of three areas in physics are covered, including electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. The sequence of topics includes an introduction to electric and magnetic fields. This is followed by the nature of light as an electromagnetic wave and topics associated with geometric optics. The final topic discussed in the course is quantum mechanics. Prerequisites: MAT-264, PHY-121, and PHY-121L. Co-Requisite: PHY-122L.

Course Description

This course utilizes lab experimentation to practice concepts of physical principles introduced in the PHY-122 lecture course. Some of the topics students understand and analyze involve the relationship between electric charges and insulators/conductors, magnetism in physics, energy transformations in electric circuits, the relationship between magnetism and electricity, and how they relate to the medical industry. Prerequisites: MAT-264, PHY-121, and PHY-121L. Co-Requisite: PHY-122.

Course Description

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of electric circuits. Students will learn methods for analyzing DC networks under different loading conditions. Topics include Kirchoff’s voltage and current laws, node analysis, mesh analysis, impedance, series and parallel load combinations, transient analysis, operational amplifiers (op-amps), and Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (SPICE) modeling. Students also develop skills in PCB fabrication and soldering. Prerequisites: PHY-111 and PHY-111L or PHY-121 and PHY-121L. Co-Requisite: EET-202L.

Course Description

This laboratory-based course reinforces the analysis of DC networks by providing additional hands on experience in breadboarding, modeling, and measuring inputs and outputs for a given circuit. Prerequisites: PHY-111 and PHY-111L or PHY-121 and PHY-121L. Co-Requisite: EET-202.

Course Description

This course focus is on the analysis of two- and three-dimensional forces on a system in an equilibrium (static) state. Further, it discusses real world applications for static analyses via simple trusses, frames, machines, and beams. Additional topics covered include properties of areas, second moments, internal forces in beams, laws of friction, and static simulation in Solidworks. Prerequisite: PHY-121, PHY-121L, ESG-251.

Course Description

This course introduces the principles of kinematics and kinetics as they apply to engineering systems and analyses. This course covers Newton’s second law, work-energy and power, impulse and momentum methods. Additional topics include vibrations and an introduction to transient responses. Simulation with Solidworks and MATLAB are also covered. Prerequisite: ESG-260. Co-Requisite: MEE-360L.

Course Description

This course utilizes lab experimentation and computer simulation to further explore the concepts and principles introduced in the MEE-360 lecture course. Students will learn how to set up and perform engineering tests and simulations in the context of complex, real-world engineering problems. Prerequisite: ESG-260. Co-Requisite: MEE-360.

Course Description

This course examines the various methods of controlling electrical mechanical systems using lumped parameter models. Topics include interfacing with analog and digital sensors, motors, and actuators. Advanced control software will be used for programming the systems. Prerequisites: EET-202 and EET-202L.

Course Description

This course introduces basic concepts in applied statistics for industrial engineers, beginning with foundational probability theory, descriptive statistics, sampling, and hypothesis testing. Linear regression and forecasting methods will be augmented by software for calculations and analysis. Relevant applications to quality processes in industrial engineering will be discussed, including Six Sigma and control charting. Prerequisite: MAT-262.

Course Description

This course is an extension of Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) for Mechanical Engineering Technology.. Tools for Computer-Aided Design (CAD), Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM), and CAE, in general will be used in a variety of industrial applications. Emphasis will be placed upon how these computerized tools can be used in design and manufacturing including the introduction of Computerized Numerical Control (CNC) systems for the generation of tools paths and tool design. Prerequisite: ESG-250 or ESG-251.

Course Description

This course covers concepts of the strength of materials. Principally, the strength characteristics of metals will be examined including their performance in bending, torsion, shear, and uniaxial loading conditions. Additional topics will include buckling and pressure vessel calculations. Prerequisite: MET-212 or ESG-260.

Course Description

This course covers analytical and practical methods of design, analysis, and reliability of mechanical systems. Design component elements include gears, belts, pulleys, chains, brakes, and power screws. Basic stress calculations and material selection will also be discussed. Prerequisites: MET-212 and MET-275 or ESG-260 and MET-275.

Course Description

This course examines fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Topics include flow measurement, pressure drop, heat exchangers, and hydraulics and their subsequent industrial applications. Prerequisites: MET-213 and CHM-113 or MEE-360 and CHM-113.

Course Description

This course builds on the topics of EET-202 and introduces more advanced circuit analysis concepts. Topics include complex impedance, AC steady-state response, resonance, passive and active filters, Bode plots, and magnetic circuits. Students practice circuit design and verification in MATLAB. Prerequisites: PHY-111 and PHY-111L or PHY-121 and PHY-121L.

Course Description

This course introduces students to manufacturing, assembly, and material handling processes through a prototype automation project. Areas of focus include the use of intelligent machines, cost and quality factors, safety protocols, control system design, device interfacing, and programming of electromechanical devices. Prerequisite: ETG-410. Co-Requisite: ETG-333.

Course Description

The first capstone course provides students the opportunity to work in teams to tackle real world applied research and design projects in their chosen area of interest. Students develop a project proposal, conduct a feasibility study, learn to protect intellectual property, develop teamwork skills, budgets, and a schedule for completing the project. Students conduct extensive research, integrate information from multiple sources, and work with a mentor through multiple cycles of feedback and revisions. Students use this course to further develop technical writing and business presentation skills. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ESG-395.

Course Description

This course examines the different aspects of material use in manufacturing processes. Topics include mechanical properties of metals, composites, atomic structure, corrosion, creep, failure theories, and heat treatment. Prerequisites: MET-203 and CHM-113.

Course Description

This course covers topics in electrical and mechanical instrumentation and data acquisition. Topics include gauges and transducers, calibration, intelligent devices and sensor technologies, signal noise and conditioning, computerized data acquisition (DAQ) systems, results documentation, and statistical analysis of data. Prerequisites: EET-202 and EET-202L.

Course Description

The second capstone course provides students the opportunity to implement and present the applied research project designed, planned, and started in the first capstone course. The capstone project is a culmination of all the learning experiences in an engineering program. Students conduct extensive research, integrate information from multiple sources, and work with a mentor through multiple cycles of feedback and revision. Prerequisite: ESG-451.

Course Description

This course will emphasize the necessary elements leading to quality production. Course topics will include Statistical Process Control (SPC) and Six-Sigma. Prerequisite: MAT-274 or ESG-374 or ISE-301.

Course Description

This course teaches preventative maintenance and fault isolation. Students learn about common failure modes and ways to increase system reliability. Topics include safety, test equipment, troubleshooting methodology, interpreting schematics, power distribution, common control circuits, and motor maintenance. Prerequisite: EET-302.

Course Description

This course introduces students to electromechanical design principles in actuation and controls. Students will complete a semester-long hands-on, scaffolded project, with consideration for safety, cost and additional factors. Prerequisites: MET-302 and ETG-426.

Locations

GCU Campus Student


Join Grand Canyon University’s vibrant and growing campus community, with daytime classes designed for traditional students. Immerse yourself in a full undergraduate experience, complete with curriculum designed within the context of our Christian worldview.

* Please note that this list may contain programs and courses not presently offered, as availability may vary depending on class size, enrollment and other contributing factors. If you are interested in a program or course listed herein please first contact your University Counselor for the most current information regarding availability.

* Please refer to the Academic Catalog for more information. Programs or courses subject to change.

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