Psychology PhD in Educational Technology Integration — Quantitative

Doctor of Philosophy in General Psychology: Integrating Technology, Learning, and Psychology (Quantitative Research)

Offered By: College of Doctoral Studies

Integrate Psychology, Technology & Instruction Into Learning Environments

Grand Canyon University’s quantitative Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in General Psychology with an Emphasis in Integrating Technology, Learning and Psychology degree can prepare you to engage with current knowledge and research concerning cognition and instruction when paired with technology.

Throughout the program, courses explore the integration of psychology, technology, and learning as it relates to researching and implementing innovative solutions for learning and communications. These concepts are explored from all sides, providing the context and background research needed to make a significant contribution to the way our society uses technology for learning.

Why Specialize in Technology and Learning with a Quantitative PhD in Quantitative General Psychology

A PhD in quantitative general psychology allows learners to dive deep into the history and current trends of core areas such as individual systems of psychology as well as cognition, personality, abnormal, social, multicultural and developmental psychology. However, the quantitative aspect of the program enables learners to go beyond existing research and explore their area of interest for themselves through research and dissertation.

Courses and the dissertation allow students to go beyond theoretical knowledge and develop a rationale for integration and change of learning and technology innovation, including factors such as costs and benefits that enable learners to create successful change.

GCU’s program gives students the opportunity to explore psychology from a Christian perspective and worldview. A significant focus is placed on practicing psychology and engaging in education through an ethical framework.

How Many Years Will It Take to Earn a PhD in General Psychology?

The PhD in Integrating Technology, Learning and Psychology degree program can be completed on your own time, giving you the power to fit pursuing your degree into your schedule.

Eight-week courses are completed online and the program includes two or three in-person residencies, where students can attend and find support and guidance as they begin the dissertation process. After the completion of the coursework, learners will use quantitative methodology to design, collect and analyze information in alignment with conducting a scholarly dissertation.

Careers for a Quantitative PhD in Educational Technology Integration Psychology

After completing this program, learners will have been prepared with the research, skills and knowledge necessary to become an innovator in psychology, technology and learning. The completion throughout the program of a dissertation enables learners to make a tangible contribution to their field of interest even before graduation, and additional coursework prepares them to continue making a difference as they continue on in their career.

The skills and abilities developed through the program can prepare graduates for many impactful positions such as:

  • Instructional coordinator
  • Curriculum developer
  • Learning material developer
  • Professor at the college or university level
  • Educational administrator

To discover more about how you can pursue your personal and professional goals with a quantitative PhD in General Psychology in Integrating Technology, Learning and Psychology, apply online for free today!

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TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS & COURSE LENGTH:
Total Program Credits: 60
Online: 8 weeks
[More Info]
TRANSFER CREDITS:
Up to 9 doctoral credits
PROGRAM TUITION RATE:
Online: $695 per credit [More Info]

Course List

Major:
60 credits
Total Degree Requirements:
60 credits

Program Core Courses

Course Description

This course introduces doctoral learners to the principle elements of research, scholarly writing, and effective argumentation. Learners are made aware of the dispositions and expectations of doctoral researchers as well as the University’s overarching values and beliefs regarding research and the responsibility of scholars to contribute new knowledge to their respective fields of study. Learners begin the process of identifying a researchable dissertation topic and are acquainted with appropriate scholarly resources that support the development of the dissertation.

Course Description

In this course, learners are introduced to the critical reading of scholarly qualitative and quantitative literature at the doctoral level. Learners also explore the concept of synthesizing the scholarly literature to identify problems and problem spaces that emerge to form a researchable topic of study. The application of scholarly argumentation from the extant literature to defend the need for a research study is discussed.

Course Description

This course is designed to familiarize the graduate student with the major schools of thought in psychology and their philosophical origins. The individuals and their personal experiences are examined in depth. The social, economic, and political forces that have influenced the developing discipline of psychology are also examined.

Course Description

This course is an introduction to the nature, origins, and history of psychoanalysis and psychotherapy. Although not a clinically based course, the course does address the psychoanalytic and psychotherapeutic strategies used to assist individuals with managing personal and inter-personal issues leading to improved mental health.

Course Description

In this course, learners are introduced to key components of qualitative and quantitative research designs and the means to critically appraise the application of research designs as observed in the scholarly literature. The University's core research designs are presented. Consideration is given to the initial selection and defense of a research design to address a problem that emerged from the extant literature.

Course Description

This residency allows learners to continue developing their skills as academic researchers. Learners will have hands-on experience applying quantitative and qualitative design principals to develop the foundational elements for their potential dissertation studies. Prerequisite: RES-850, RES-825, RES-831, or RCS-831.

Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the sampling, data collection, and data analysis methods employed in qualitative and quantitative research designs. Learners explore the alignment of sampling, data collection, and data analysis methods to the research topic, research questions, and research design. The course positions learners to select qualitative or quantitative designs for their dissertation studies. Prerequisite: RES-831.

Course Description

This course examines the historical and theoretical background of the behavioristic movement and its major works. The course also examines methods and techniques to help teach and learn new behaviors as well as the concepts and strategies to diminish or eliminate unwanted behaviors.

Course Description

This course discusses foundational theoretical research in areas such as cognition, motivation, learning, communications, and collaboration. Applications to both learning and communications solutions are addressed as are research initiatives.

Course Description

In this course, learners explore the basic components of quantitative research design. Attention is given to variables, instrumentation, and sources of data. Reliability and validity of instrumentation is discussed in the context of GCU core quantitative research designs.

Course Description

In this course, learners interact with statistical tests and statistical analysis software in the context of designing a quantitative research study. Alignment of statistical tests to research questions, hypotheses and design is stressed as is determining the feasibility of a quantitative research study. Ethical aspects of research are discussed. Prerequisite: RES-842.

Course Description

This course explores the historical roots, theoretical foundations, major works, and guiding philosophy of Humanistic, Transpersonal and Existential (HTE) psychology. This course also examines the different approaches to studying HTE as it relates to human motivation, needs, will, love, and existence in a contemporary world.

Course Description

This course enables the learner to research current and emerging technologies in learning and communications. The psychology of applying technology to individuals, organizations, and communities, and the assessment of risks and benefits associated with the use of technology are discussed.

Course Description

In this residency, learners orally present and defend an expanded design of their preliminary dissertation research from RSD-851. Emphasis is placed on developing the quantitative dissertation. Practicum/field experience hours: None. RES-844.

Course Description

The integration of psychology, technology, and learning is discussed as it relates to innovative research and solutions for learning and communications. The development of a rationale for integration and change including factors such as costs, benefits, and risks is addressed as learners integrate theories, such as social intelligence, to enable successful change.

Course Description

In this course, learners apply the skills of the practitioner-scholar. They are self-motivated and committed to reflective practice. They actively seek input from other scholars while continuing to design independent research under the guidance of the dissertation committee. Prerequisite: RES-871, PSY-885, RSD-883, or RSD-884.

Course Description

In this course, learners focus on data collection, data preparation and management, and the analysis of quantitative data to produce written research findings, results, and implications. Learners continue to work with their respective dissertation chairs and apply information from this course to move ahead in the dissertation process. Prerequisite: RES-844.

Course Description

In this course, learners apply the skills of the practitioner-scholar. They are self-motivated and committed to reflective practice. They actively seek input from other scholars while continuing to design and/or conduct independent research under the guidance of the dissertation committee. Prerequisite: PSY-955.

Course Description

In this course, learners focus on the interpretation of quantitative data to produce written research findings, results, and implications. Learners continue to work with their respective dissertation chairs and apply information from this course to move ahead in the dissertation process. Prerequisite: RES-874.

Course Description

In this course, learners apply the skills of the practitioner-scholar. They are self-motivated and committed to reflective practice. They actively seek input from other scholars while continuing to design and/or conduct independent research under the guidance of the dissertation committee. Prerequisite: PSY-960.

Program Locations

GCU Online Student


Pursue a next-generation education with an online degree from Grand Canyon University. Earn your degree with convenience and flexibility with online courses that let you study anytime, anywhere.

GCU Evening Student


Grand Canyon University’s evening programs cater to the demands of working professionals who prefer an in-person learning environment. Our night classes meet just once per week and offer the interaction and discussion of a typical college classroom.

* Please note that this list may contain programs that are not presently offered as program availability may vary depending on class size, enrollment and other contributing factors. If you are interested in a program listed herein please first contact your University Counselor for the most current information regarding availability of the program.

Program Domains

* Please refer to the Academic Catalog for more information. Program subject to change.

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