Is It Hard to Learn Computer Programming?

female computer programmer working in office

The need for computer programming degree graduates is higher than ever. At any given time, there are more jobs posted for software developers than there are qualified candidates.1 This means that now is a great time to consider earning your computer programming degree.

If you are interested in technology and enjoy solving problems, computer programming may be a fulfilling career for you. Yet, as you consider programming, you may wonder if a computer programming degree path may be too difficult. The good news is that you do not need any prior skills in coding or programming in order to earn your computer programming degree. The degree program will take you from basic to advanced skills, equipping you with the knowledge you need to be successful in class and on into your career.

Can I Learn How to Program Computers?

The short answer is yes. Programming computers is all about learning certain languages. Just like learning any type of foreign language, it is not necessarily easy to master quickly, but it is not impossible to make major strides in a short time.

Most computer programmers are learning every time they sit down to do work. There are limitless amounts of things that a computer programmer needs to know, but many of these things have been documented before. What is great about computer programming is that it is a career that is constantly developing. Programmers are learning new things and they share them widely so that they can be replicated by others.

Computer Programming Languages

Whether you want to develop a mobile application, get programming certification or learn new skills, you need to choose the right programming language to learn. Many computer programming languages are easy for beginners to pick up. In a survey of software developers, respondents suggested that these five languages were the easiest to learn:2

  1. HTML: HTML is known as the primary web language. It gives structure and meaning to web content. It is made up of ready-made sets of code building blocks, so people new to computer programming have an easier time writing code and executing and creating interactive website features.
  2. Python: Python is popular because it is applicable in many different scenarios and can be used to build just about anything.
  3. JavaScript: JavaScript is one of the many coding languages that allows you to write object-oriented code. It is also easy to learn.
  4. PHP: PHP is a not so forgiving coding language but it allows you to make errors and still come out with a working application. It also allows you to go back over and look at where you make mistakes in order to correct them for the future.
  5. Java: Java has been around for more than 20 years. It is used by a number of industries and applications. It is a good idea to learn Java if you have not yet decided on what industry you would like to work in.

Languages You Will Learn in a Computer Programming Degree

Most computer programming degree programs will start you off with learning at least a few languages like Python, Java and C++. However, computer programming degrees are set up to ensure that you are ready to enter the field after graduation. This means they will follow the trends and offer up the most relevant and in-demand computing languages. So, you might learn simpler languages and others such as:

  • HTML
  • C/C++
  • C #
  • Go
  • Kotlin
  • Swift

Along with Python, Java and C++, these languages help you become more marketable. They cover everything from web and internet development to scientific computing use cases. They also help you build enterprise architecture and cloud computing applications. You can use them in web development, app development, robotics, networking and security systems. Some of them are meant for front-end website development, while others are mostly back end tools.

Computer Programming is More Than Tech

While computer programming and learning several new coding languages may seem intimidating, the career it leads to is not just concerned with the technical aspects. There are certain characteristics and skills that will help you become a successful computer programmer.

Interest in Computers

If you are going to spend the rest of your career working as a computer programmer, you should enjoy working with computers. As a child, you probably spent hours playing computer games and wondering about the technology around you. Learning programming languages and becoming a computer programmer can help you better understand the answers to all of those questions.

Patience

Learning coding and new programming languages requires that you have patience. It can be easy to get annoyed when code is not working out or the application is not functioning in the way that you expect. Debugging software can take a lot of time and effort. However, if you have patience and can work through your problems, you will always be learning new things in your computer programming career.

Problem-Solving Ability

Computer programming is essentially a job of problem-solving. You need to approach each coding session as a puzzle. There are many things that need to be solved as you start working on a program, software or application. If you like the challenge of fixing things when they do not work, then computer programming is probably a great career choice for you.

Logic and Order

Computer programming requires an understanding and appreciation for details. If one tiny thing is missed, many things can go wrong. Therefore, being comfortable working logically and in an organized way is important for a computer programmer.

If you are ready to take on the challenge of earning your computer programming degree, join us at Grand Canyon University for the Bachelor of Science in Computer Programming. You will learn several programming languages and be challenged to enter the exciting world of computer programming.

Retrieved from:

1 https://fullscale.io/blog/talent-shortage-software-developers/

2 https://wpengine.com/developers-feel-programming-languages/

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author’s and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Grand Canyon University.

Loading Form


Scroll back to top