3 Personality Traits That Mean You Should Be a Professional Writer

By Lindsay Marquette
Student, College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Posted on June 25, 2018  in  [ Criminal Justice, Government, and Public Administration ]

Professional writing is one of the most overlooked professions in America today. People think that writing is a bit of a joke, because when they hear that someone is a writer, they quickly make an assumption that writers do not make any money and that they just sit around toying with ideas for a novel.

This is very untrue; the writing world is full of new opportunities and judging by the quality of the average American’s use of grammar, we could use a few more professional writers in the workforce. If the idea of being a professional writer sounds at all interesting to you and you think you may have what it takes, keep reading, because I have three personality traits that I have observed throughout my college career that most professional writers possess.

You are a tad obsessive

Although this may sound like a negative trait and don’t get me wrong, it has its annoying moments, it really is a good thing. Being somewhat obsessive can translate into perfectionism, which is a trait that is actually very useful in the working world. Granted, a lot of people are perfectionists in America, partially because a lot of jobs require it; however, I have noticed that almost every single person I have encountered who is in the professional writing major is somewhat obsessive about everything in their writing being perfect. This includes grammar, spelling and the overall quality of their work. This is a great trait to have in the professional writing world.

You find it almost impossible not to correct your friends’ grammar and spelling errors

Anytime that you text your friends and they use an incorrect spelling, or their grammar is wrong, you have an impossibly intense urge to correct them and it takes all of your willpower to just ignore it. Once your friends have realized that you have a deep and somewhat unsettling desire to correct their grammatical and spelling mistakes, they figure they may as well ask you to help proofread their essays. Although annoying at times, this trait is great to have in the world of writing.

You legitimately enjoy researching things in your free time

Research is something that most people, especially students, view as a chore. It can be time consuming and can require a surprising amount of effort, energy and perseverance, so finding people who actually find it exciting or interesting is rare. If you are one of the few people who truly enjoys research and even does it in your free time, there’s a good chance that you would enjoy and succeed in a writing career.

Each of these three traits are extremely beneficial in the writing world, so if you have any or all of these, consider becoming a professional writer! Although you don’t have to have these traits to be a successful writer, they can be indicators of your compatibility with writing. At the end of the day, do what you love!

If you want to learn more about Grand Canyon University’s English program within the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, check out our website or click the Request More Information button on this page.

More about Lindsay:

Lindsay Marquette is a professional writing major, who graduated in April 2018 from Grand Canyon University. She has enjoyed different types of writing since she was young, and now at 21, she is looking forward to being able to use her skills in a work setting. She hopes to use her degree to help her jumpstart a career in journalism and freelance writing.

Lindsay enjoys practicing painting and other fine arts in her free time, and spending time with her family at home. She was born and raised in Hillsboro, Oregon, and loves visiting and exploring the nearby city of Portland. Hiking is a favorite pastime of hers, and she enjoys going to the gym and running. Despite being raised in the rain, she has developed a love for Arizona, and the sunny, warm weather.

About College of Humanities and Social Sciences

As the title of our blog suggests, these posts by College of Humanities and Social Sciences (CHSS) faculty and special guests will engage, inform and challenge you in a myriad of ways. The posts reflect the diversity of our programs of study: degrees that are traditional (history), current (justice studies and communications), academic (English literature) and career-oriented (psychology, counseling, criminal justice and government). Here, there is something for everyone.


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